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Friday, January 23, 2015

ICC Cricket World Cup 2015: Father-son pairs in World Cups

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Rod (left) and Tom Latham may become the fourth father-son pair to play in the World Cup © Getty Images
As the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 is about to tee off, several sons of former World Cup stars — Stuart Broad, Tom Latham, and Mitchell Marsh and Stuart Binny— have been included in various squads. Khondoker Hafizur Rahman looks back at father-son pairs to have played World Cup cricket.

Family affairs are a common matter in cricket, even at the highest level. There have been many instances of father and son both playing Tests as well as two examples of three generations (the Khans and the Headleys) playing Test cricket. Despite its late inception, One-Day Internationals (ODIs) have had their fair share of fathers and sons as well. Surprisingly, not a lot of these pairs have played in the World Cup.
When Derek Pringle took field against West Indies at Gujranwala in World Cup 1987, he created a record by being the first World Cupper’s son to play the tournament. His father Don had played two matches in World Cup 1975 for East Africa (and passed away less than four months after his last outing). Derek was born in Kenya.
The next edition of the World Cup saw Chris, son of Lance Cairns, take field. Lance Cairns had played international cricket till December 1985, while Chris made his international debut in November 1989; the gap of less than four years is the least for any father-son combination.
Chris Broad had made his World Cup debut alongside Derek Pringle. Chris’ son Stuart followed his father’s footsteps in 2007 when he played his first World Cup match against West Indies at Kensington Oval (it was also Brian Lara’s last international match). Stuart was a regular in 2011 and has been included in the 2015 squad.
Roger Binny was a member of the World Cup winning side of 1983. Geoff Marsh was the first cricketer to win the World Cup as both player (in 1987) and coach (in 1999). Rod Latham had been a crucial cog in Martin Crowe’s famous dibbly-dobbly-wibbly-wobbly scheme in World Cup 1992. Their sons, Mitchell Marsh, Tom Latham, and Stuart Binny, are all set to make their World Cup debuts in 2015.

Saturday, January 17, 2015

ALL 14 Team Final World Cup Squads Announced

All 14 of the finalised 15 Man squads for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 have now been announced as the World's greatest cricket tournament looms large on the horizon with just over a month to go now.
ALL 14 Final World Cup Squads Announced - Cricket News
As the countdown to ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 rapidly gathers pace, the talk of the the cricket world has been around the final squads for all 14 nations competing in Australia and New Zealand.

All of the squads are now confirmed and it will be an elite group of 210 cricketers that will carry the hopes of their nations into the greatest cricket tournament of all.

All of the squads will be updated below as they continue to get released.  Remember to check out all the fixtures here and join the conversation across on Social Media with the hashtag #cwc15.

Afghanistan



Mohammad Nabi was named the captain of Afghanistan’s 15-man squad for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 that will take place in Australia and New Zealand in February and March.

This will be Afghanistan’s maiden appearance in a World Cup, although the side has some big-match experience, having taken part in World Twenty20 tournaments earlier. The side will continue to rely on the core of senior players – with the likes of Samiullah Shenwari, Nawroz Mangal, Asghar Stanikzai, Shapoor Zadran, Dawlat Zadran, Mirwais Ashraf and Hamid Hassan all part of the side.

Afghanistan Squad for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Mohammad Nabi (capt),
Nawroz Mangal,
Asghar Stanikzai,
Samiullah Shenwari,
Afsar Zazai (wk),
Najibullah Zadran,
Nasir Jamal,
Mirwais Ashraf,
Gulbadin Naib,
Hamid Hassan,
Shapoor Zadran,
Dawlat Zadran,
Aftab Alam,
Javed Ahmadi,
Usman Ghani.

Australia

Cricket Australia’s National Selection Panel has announced the 15-man squad to represent Australia at the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 to be played in Australia and New Zealand in February and March.

Captain Michael Clarke has been named in the squad despite his ongoing injury concerns, a standby player for Clarke has not been named however if Clarke became unavailable, George Bailey will captain the side in his absence.

In a squad packed with attacking fast bowlers, the co-hosts will be looking to ICC Player of the Year Mitchell Johnson to lead the line with support from Josh Hazlewood, Mitchell Starc and the exciting Pat Cummins.

Australia is aiming to claim a record fifth ICC Cricket World Cup after winning the tournament in India in 1987, England in 1999, South Africa in 2003 and the West Indies in 2007.

Australia'a squad for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Michael Clarke (capt),
George Bailey (vice-capt),
Pat Cummins,
Xavier Doherty,
James Faulkner,
Aaron Finch,
Brad Haddin,
Josh Hazlewood,
Mitchell Johnson,
Mitchell Marsh,
Glenn Maxwell,
Steve Smith,
Mitchell Starc,
David Warner,
Shane Watson.

Bangladesh



Mashrafe Mortaza will captain the Bangladesh side in its ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 campaign, with Shakib Al Hasan named the vice-captain of the 15-man squad.

Tamim Iqbal and Mushfiqur Rahim will form the core of the side alongside Mortaza and Shakib, while among the younger lot, there were call-ups for Soumya Sarkar, the 21-year-old allrounder who has done well in domestic cricket this season, Taskin Ahmed, the 19-year-old fast bowler, and Taijul Islam, who had a sensational ODI debut against Zimbabwe where he picked up 4 for 11 to became the first bowler to take a hat-trick on ODI debut.

Bangladesh Squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Mashrafe Mortaza (capt)
Shakib Al Hasan (vice-capt)
Tamim Iqbal
Anamul Haque
Mominul Haque
Mahmudullah Riaz
Mushfiqur Rahim (wk)
Nasir Hossain
Taijul Islam
Taskin Ahmed
Al-Amin Hossain
Rubel Hossain
Soumya Sarkar
Sabbir Rahman
Arafat Sunny

England



England selectors have made three changes to the one-day squad that lost 5-2 to Sri Lanka in December. Led by Eoin Morgan, James Anderson and Stuart Broad return from injury with batsman Gary Ballance also included. Alastair Cook, Ben Stokes and Harry Gurney are the three players to miss out from the most recent one-day squad.

England Squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Eoin Morgan (Middlesex) (Capt)
Moeen Ali (Worcestershire)
James Anderson (Lancashire)
Gary Ballance (Yorkshire)
Ian Bell (Warwickshire)
Ravi Bopara (Essex)
Stuart Broad (Nottinghamshire)
Jos Buttler (Lancashire)
Steven Finn (Middlesex)
Alex Hales (Nottinghamshire)
Chris Jordan (Sussex)
Joe Root (Yorkshire)
James Taylor (Nottinghamshire)
James Tredwell (Kent)
Chris Woakes (Warwickshire)

India



India have named their final squad for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015. MS Dhoni will lead the 15-man Indian squad that will aim to defend its ICC Cricket World Cup title in Australia and New Zealand in February-March.

Ravindra Jadeja and Stuart Binny have been included as all-rounders, whilst Axar Patel and Ravinchandran Ashwin offer spin options. The squad also features several fast bowlers with Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Mohammed Shami, Umesh Yadav and Ishant Sharma leading the line.

India Squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Mahendra Singh Dhoni (capt, wk)
Virat Kohli (vice-capt)
Ajinkya Rahane
Shikhar Dhawan
Rohit Sharma
Stuart Binny
Suresh Raina
Ravindra Jadeja
Ambati Rayudu
Axar Patel
Ravichandran Ashwin
Bhuvneshwar Kumar
Mohammed Shami
Umesh Yadav
Ishant Sharma.

Ireland



Ireland’s selectors have confirmed their squad for the World Cup next month in Australia and New Zealand. There are no changes to the 15 players named last month for the training camp and tri-series in Dubai against Afghanistan and Scotland.

Captain William Porterfield is one of five players who will be participating in their third World Cup, along with the O’Brien brothers, Ed Joyce, and John Mooney.

Ireland Squad for the ICC World Cup 2015

William Porterfield (Captain),
Andrew Balbirnie,
Peter Chase,
Alex Cusack,
George Dockrell,
Ed Joyce,
Andrew McBrine,
John Mooney,
Tim Murtagh,
Kevin O’Brien,
Niall O’Brien,
Paul Stirling,
Stuart Thompson,
Gary Wilson,
Craig Young.

New Zealand



Brendon McCullum will lead a full-strength New Zealand squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015. The batting line-up boasts of experience in the form of McCullum, Martin Guptill, Ross Taylor and Kane Williamson, while Corey Anderson and Grant Elliott, who last played an ODI in November 2013, will serve as the allrounders.

The spin department will be manned by the experienced Daniel Vettori and Nathan McCullum.

New Zealand squad for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Brendon McCullum (captain)
Corey Anderson
Trent Boult
Grant Elliott
Martin Guptill
Tom Latham
Mitchell McClenaghan
Nathan McCullum
Kyle Mills
Adam Milne
Luke Ronchi
Tim Southee
Ross Taylor
Dan Vettori
Kane Williamson

Pakistan



The Pakistan Cricket Board announced its 15-member squad for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 to be held in Australia and New Zealand. The squad contains two openers, four middle order batsmen, five pace bowlers, one spinner, two all-rounders and a wicket-keeper/batsman.

Sohail Khan, the seamer, who last represented Pakistan in 2011, was included. Shoiab Maqsood, Junaid Khan and Ehsan Adil have all recovered from injuries and will feature in the squad. Pakistan fans will be delighted by the presence of Shahid Afridi who will play in a fifth ICC Cricket World Cup since his debut back in 1999.

Pakistan Squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Misbah-ul-Haq (capt)
Ahmed Shehzad
Younis Khan
Mohammad Hafeez
Haris Sohail
Sarfraz Ahmed
Umar Akmal
Sohaib Maqsood
Shahid Afridi
Yasir Shah
Mohammad Irfan
Junaid Khan
Ehsan Adil
Sohail Khan
Wahab Riaz

Scotland



Cricket Scotland’s selectors have named their final squad of 15 players to compete in the 2015 ICC Cricket World Cup in New Zealand and Australia.

Scotland will start their Group A campaign on February 17th against hosts New Zealand, in what is now a sold out fixture, in Dunedin.
Preston Mommsen will lead Scotland to their third World Cup campaign, and will be determined to help secure their first win on the global stage, while looking to boost their current One Day International ranking of 14th in the world.

Scotland Squad for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Preston Mommsen (captain),
Kyle Coetzer (vice-captain),
Richie Berrington,
Frederick Coleman,
Matthew Cross,
Joshua Davey,
Alasdair Evans,
Hamish Gardiner,
Majid Haq,
Michael Leask,
Matt Machan,
Calum MacLeod,
Safyaan Sharif,
Robert Taylor,
Iain Wardlaw.


South Africa



AB De Villiers will lead a full strength South Africa squad to Australia and New Zealand in February to challenge for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

There are eight players with previous World Cup experience, De Villiers, Hashim Amla, Faf du Plessis, JP Duminy, Wayne Parnell, Morne Morkel, Dale Steyn and Imran Tahir. Whilst of the newcomers, Farhaan Behardien, Quinton de Kock and Vernon Philander will be hoping to shine for the first time on the ICC Cricket World Cup stage.

South Africa Squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

AB de Villiers (capt),
Hashim Amla (vice-capt)
Kyle Abbott
Farhaan Behardien
Quinton de Kock
JP Duminy
Faf du Plessis
Imran Tahir
David Miller
Morne Morkel
Wayne Parnell
Aaron Phangiso
Vernon Philander
Rilee Rossouw
Dale Steyn

Sri Lanka



Sachithra Senanayake and Lasith Malinga were named in Sri Lanka's 15-man squad, Malinga last figured in an international fixture four months ago and his participation is subject to fitness.

The Angelo Mathews-led squad also features Kumar Sangakkara, Tillakaratne Dilshan and Mahela Jayawardene, the experienced trio that was part of the team that finished runners-up at the 2011 edition in the subcontinent.

Alongside Lahiru Thirimanne, the vice-captain, Dimuth Karunaratne and Dinesh Chandimal, these three form the core specialist batting group, with Mathews, Thisara Perera and Jeevan Mendis  adding another dimension to the mix with their all-round abilities.

Sri Lanka Squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Angelo Mathews (capt)
Lahiru Thirimanne (vice-capt)
Dimuth Karunaratne
Tillakaratne Dilshan
Kumar Sangakkara (wk)
Mahela Jayawardene
Dinesh Chandimal
Thisara Perera
Jeevan Mendis
Suranga Lakmal
Lasith Malinga
Dhammika Prasad
Nuwan Kulasekara
Rangana Herath
Sachithra Senanayake

United Arab Emirates



The Emirates Cricket Board has announced that the team will be captained by UAE National Mohammed Tauqir, with Khurram Khan as Vice Captain.

Considered a solid middle-order batsman and a right-arm offspinner, Tauqir has been an outstanding performer in the UAE’s World Cup preparations, showing positive development in both skill and fitness.

The UAE Squad also includes several members that represented them at their inaugural ICC World Twenty20 appearance in 2014 with Swapnil Patel, Rohan Mustafa, Kamran Shahzad and others returning for another ICC Global Event.

UAE Squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Mohammed Tauqir (Captain)
Khurram Khan (Vice Captain)
Swapnil Patil
Saqlain Haider
Amjad Javed
Shaiman Anwar
Amjad Ali
Nasir Aziz
Rohan Mustafa
Manjula Guruge
Andri Berenger
Fahad Al Hashmi
Muhammad Naveed
Kamran Shahzad
K Karate

West Indies

Jason Holder captains the 1975 & 1979 World Cup Winners who will be looking for a third Cricket World Cup title,  seasoned batsman Marlon Samuels has been appointed Vice Captain.

The most experienced ODI player in the squad is opener Chris Gayle with 258 appearances. Samuels (162), Denesh Ramdin (115) and Darren Sammy (115) all have over a hundred ODI games under their belts. Dwayne Smith (94) could achieve his 100th appearance during the Cricket World Cup.

The squad has a total of 1156 ODI appearances with only Sheldon Cottrell and Jonathan Carter yet to debut internationally. Carter and
Cottrell are both in the West Indies ODI squad to face South Africa in a five match series to commence shortly.

West Indies squad for the ICC Cricket World Cup.

Jason Holder (capt),
Marlon Samuels (vice-capt),
Chris Gayle,
Darren Bravo,
Lendl Simmons,
Dwayne Smith,
Andre Russell,
Darren Sammy,
Jonathan Carter,
Denesh Ramdin (wk),
Sunil Narine,
Sheldon Cottrell,
Kemar Roach,
Jerome Taylor,
Sulieman Benn.


Zimbabwe



Zimbabwe's 15-man squad for the 2015 ICC Cricket World Cup sees Elton Chigumbura lead his country as captain.

Hamilton Masakadza, who made his international debut 14 years ago, is set to play in his first World Cup. Masakadza will form the batting core alongside Sikander Raza, Brendan Taylor, Craig Ervine and Sean Williams.

The bowling group will be led by Tinashe Panyangara, who is likely to share the new ball with Tendai Chatara. They will be joined by Tawanda Mupariwa, the right-arm pacer, who last played an ODI in 2009. Tafadzwa Kamungozi, the legspinner, and Raza and Stuart Matsikenyeri, the offspinners, complete the bowling unit.

Zimbabwe Squad for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Elton Chigumbura (capt),
Sikandar Raza,
Regis Chakabva,
Tendai Chatara,
Chamu Chibhabha,
Craig Ervine,
Tafadzwa Kamungozi,
Hamilton Masakadza,
Stuart Matsikenyeri,
Solomon Mire,
Tawanda Mupariwa,
Tinashe Panyangara,
Brendan Taylor (wk),
Prosper Utseya,
Sean Williams.

JAVED MIANDAD – Good that India-Pakistan are playing early in the Worldcup tournament

Having the India-Pakistan clash happen early in the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 will allow both teams to concentrate on their remaining pool matches, writes former Pakistan captain
JAVED MIANDAD – Good that India-Pakistan are playing early in the tournament - Cricket News
I think the ICC did the right thing to showcase this iconic game early in the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015, instead of slotting it midway through the group stage. It will take off some pressure from both the sides and they will concentrate more on their remaining pool matches. - Miandad
No cricketing contest can ever match the thrill and excitement of what a Pakistan versus India contest offers. It is the mother of all matches.

Whether it’s a one-sided game or a nail-biting finish, people from both countries get involved so much that sometimes it is just not cricket! Whenever or wherever we play against each other, fans from all age groups in our two cricket-mad countries forget their Things To Do. They simply get glued to their television sets or watch the action on giant screens in a hope that only their team would win.

The lucky ones have tickets to the Adelaide Oval for the absorbing contest, which is now just 29 days away. It was the first match of the mega event which got sold out within hours of the tickets going up for sale on 14 February 2014.

I think the ICC did the right thing to showcase this iconic game early in the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015, instead of slotting it midway through the group stage. It will take off some pressure from both the sides and they will concentrate more on their remaining pool matches. I do believe that all the matches in an ICC Cricket World Cup deserve equal importance, but there are some contests which builds extra pressure and stress on the players. 
No matter what the opposing captains say, players have the pressure of over a billion fans whenever they wear green and blue shirts.

What I would like to see is another exciting contest and whoever wins in Adelaide, fans should treat it as a loss on sporting field and nothing else. I would like to see the Pakistan versus India rivalry more on the cricketing field and the only way going forward is by improving our cricketing relations – both on and off the field.

While it’s tough to pick a winner of the 15 February encounter, Pakistan's loss of Umar Gul and Saeed Ajmal through injuries and suspension, respectively, is a huge setback. Considering the depth in India’s batting lineup with the likes of Rohit Sharma, Shikhar Dhawan, Virat Kohli, Suresh Raina, Ajinkya Rahane and Mahendra Dhoni, their big batting pillars, Umar and Saeed could have been proved handy for Pakistan. Without these two, I can now only hope that Mohammad Hafeez clears his retest as Pakistan needs experienced bowlers against what is sure to be a highly-experienced India batting line-up.

India’s recent 2-0 Test defeat in Australia will count for nothing in defence of its ICC Cricket World Cup title. In fact, it will be more acclimatised and have more knowhow of the pitches than the Pakistan team. The India cricket board did its homework well by scheduling its team's tour to Australia before the all-important event. Players need time to adjust to the conditions and pitches in countries like Australia and New Zealand, and the India team has grabbed that added advantage.



Remember, we also went to Australia in 1992 a month before the World Cup. We didn't win a single warm-up or practice match, but the experience of playing on various pitches helped our players when it mattered most in crucial matches.

Pakistan hasn’t played in Australia for quite some time now.

Misbah-ul-Haq, Younus Khan, Shahid Afridi and Ahmed Shehzad need to adjust quickly in a short time. We need big scores, keeping in mind the bowling resources we have and I feel nothing less than 300-325 could challenge India’s strong batting. In one-day cricket, not all of the top six batsmen have to score. What Pakistan should not forget is it needs, at least, two of its top-order batsmen to score heavily and then the rest could chip in with 30s and 40s to give the scoreboard a solid look.

Pakistan should also forget the horror stats of having never beaten India in a World Cup match. In fact, what it should remember is that we lost against it in 1992 too, but it was us who lifted the World Cup trophy at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. Pakistan should not get sidetracked in case the result doesn't go in its favour on 15 February. The focus should be to win the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015!

Playing and winning the first match in any big tournament gives a team an added confidence, but it doesn't guarantee you a place in the final. Similarly, for the losing side, it doesn't mean the end of the tournament. In fact, the loss should push you to do more, and better, in the remaining games of the tournament.

I would love to see good gestures from players of both teams and send out a strong message around the world that we love to play against each other. I know the tempers could flare up in the heat of the moment, but I do hope the captains of both sides will lead by example and there will be no nasty incident on the field during the course of what is expected to be an engrossing battle between the bat and the ball.

In the end, one team has to win and the other has to finish on a losing side. There should be no hard feelings. I have been part of a number of India versus Pakistan matches played with tremendous intensity and emotions. As a professional cricketer, I believe your country should always come first. Nobody likes to lose, but if you don't lose, it won't make you a better player. 
When I first toured India, I didn't see any problems because we used to mix-up with their players and similarly when India toured Pakistan during my playing days, we had some fantastic times with the likes of Sunil Gavaskar and Bishen Singh Bedi. I would like to see more such things happen now too between cricketers of our countries.

Neigbours will always remain neigbours and by playing against each other in tournaments like the ICC Cricket World Cup, we can help in making our relationship even stronger. Sport is an ideal tool to unite people. Everything else will fall in place if we play against each other more often with lots of sportsmanship.

I don't want to pick my winner of the 15 February contest. I just wish both sides a big good luck and whomever performs better on that day should be a well-deserved winner. The losing side should take the defeat gracefully and sportingly, and without any hard feelings.

India names final 15 man squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

MS Dhoni to lead defending champions in Australia and New Zealand

India names final 15 man squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 - Cricket News
The squad also features Virat Kohli and Suresh Raina.
India have named their final squad for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015. MS Dhoni will lead the 15-man Indian squad that will aim to defend its ICC Cricket World Cup title in Australia and New Zealand in February-March.

Ravindra Jadeja and Stuart Binny have been included as all-rounders, whilst Axar Patel and Ravinchandran Ashwin offer spin options. The squad also features several fast bowlers with Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Mohammed Shami, Umesh Yadav and Ishant Sharma leading the line.

India’s campaign starts with a Pool B match against Pakistan at the Adelaide Oval on February 15. To see the fixtures in full please click here.



India Squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015:
Mahendra Singh Dhoni (capt, wk)
Virat Kohli (vice-capt)
Ajinkya Rahane
Shikhar Dhawan
Rohit Sharma
Stuart Binny
Suresh Raina
Ravindra Jadeja
Ambati Rayudu
Axar Patel
Ravichandran Ashwin
Bhuvneshwar Kumar
Mohammed Shami
Umesh Yadav
Ishant Sharma.

Pakistan name Final 15 Man Squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015

Misbah Ul Haq to lead Pakistan in Australia and New Zealand, 23 years after Imran Khan led Pakistan to the crown down under
Pakistan name Final 15 Man Squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 - Cricket News
The Pakistan Cricket Board announced its 15-member squad for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 to be held in Australia and New Zealand on Wednesday(January 7). The squad contains two openers, four middle order batsmen, five pace bowlers, one spinner, two all-rounders and a wicket-keeper/batsman.

Sohail Khan, the seamer, who last represented Pakistan in 2011, was included. Shoiab Maqsood, Junaid Khan and Ehsan Adil have all recovered from injuries and will feature in the squad. Pakistan fans will be delighted by the presence of Shahid Afridi who will play in a fifth ICC Cricket World Cup since his debut back in 1999.



Chief Selector Moin Khan said “This is the best possible squad from the available resources, and the selectors collectively believe it has the requisite talent and skill-set to recapture the World Cup Down Under after 22 years.

 Pakistan’s campaign starts with a Pool B Match against India at the Adelaide Oval on February 15. To see Pakistan’s fixtures in full please click here.

Pakistan Squad for ICC Cricket World Cup 2015
Misbah-ul-Haq (capt)
Ahmed Shehzad
Younis Khan
Mohammad Hafeez
Haris Sohail
Sarfraz Ahmed
Umar Akmal
Sohaib Maqsood
Shahid Afridi
Yasir Shah
Mohammad Irfan
Junaid Khan
Ehsan Adil
Sohail Khan
Wahab Riaz

About ICC


Our Vision of Success

As a leading global sport, cricket will captivate and inspire people of every age, gender, background and ability while building bridges between continents, countries and communities.

Strategic Direction

A bigger, better, global game targeting more players, more fans, more competitive teams.

Our long-term success will be judged on growth in participation and public interest and the competitiveness of teams participating in men's and women's international cricket.

Mission Statement

As the international governing body for cricket, the International Cricket Council will lead by:
  • Providing a world class environment for international cricket
  • Delivering 'major' events across three formats
  • Providing targeted support to Members
  • Promoting the global game

Our Values

The ICC's actions and people are guided by the following values:
  • Fairness and Integrity
  • Excellence
  • Accountability
  • Teamwork
  • Respect for diversity
  • Commitment to the global game and its great spirit

ICC Chairman N Srinivasan


Narayanaswami Srinivasan, an industrialist, has been the president of the Tamil Nadu Cricket Association in India since 2001-02, and a part of the Board of Control for Cricket in India since 2005-06 - first as treasurer and then as secretary, before becoming the president in 2011-12.

From India’s point of view, the national team won the ICC Champions Trophy 2013 and the ICC U19 Cricket World Cup Australia 2012 since he took over as president. He has also played a pivotal role in creating and developing cricket infrastructure across India: four state of the art stadia – Rajkot, Ranchi, Pune and Dharamsala – made their international debuts in the 2012-13 season. That aside, member associations under the aegis of the BCCI benefitted under him with emphasis being placed on getting qualified coaches, physiotherapists and trainers, as well as training for match officials.

It was during Mr Srinivasan’s tenure as president of the BCCI that the board made its one-time benefit payment to international and first-class cricketers who retired before 2004 – more than Rs 100 crore was distributed among 174 cricketers (including the widows of deceased Test cricketers) as part of the scheme.


ICC President Mustafa Kamal

A chartered accountant by training, Mustafa Kamal was the Bangladesh Cricket Board (BCB) president from September 2009 to October 2013, a former chairman of the ICC’s Audit Committee, president of the Asian Cricket Council between 2010 and 2012 and the ICC Vice-President from 2012 to 2014.

He was a prominent face in the pre-Test era in Bangladesh first as director and then chairman of Abahani Limited, one of the premier cricket clubs in the country, and founded the Lotus Kamal Pace Bowling Cricket Academy, one of the first of its kind in Bangladesh. He also led the process of bringing in high-profile overseas cricketers for the Dhaka Premier Division Cricket League, the most high-profile cricket tournament in Bangladesh at the time. Later, in 2012-13, he initiated the process of bringing all first-class players under the BCB central contracts system.

Away from cricket, Mr Kamal has been elected Member of Parliament three times and is presently the Minister for Planning of the Bangladesh government.
  ICC Chief Executive David RichardsonDavid Richardson

South Africa’s premier wicketkeeper for the first seven years after its readmission to international cricket, David Richardson played 42 Tests and 122 One-Day Internationals before retiring from all cricket in 1998 after a 21-year first-class career.

Mr Richardson, a qualified lawyer, remained in touch with the game after retirement as both a media commentator as well as a business director with Octagon SA, the company responsible for negotiating player employment contracts with the United Cricket Board of South Africa, as Cricket South Africa was known then. Then, in January 2002, he was appointed the first ICC general manager of cricket, a post he retained till June 2012, before becoming the fourth ICC chief executive, replacing Haroon Lorgat.

ICC CRICKET WORLD CUP 2015 - RULES OF PLAYING CONDITIONS



ICC CRICKET WORLD CUP 2015 - PLAYING CONDITIONS

Except as varied hereunder, the Laws of Cricket (2000 Code 5th Edition - 2013) shall apply.

Note: All references to ‘Governing Body’ within the Laws of Cricket shall be replaced by ‘ICC Match Referee’.

1    LAW 1 THE PLAYERS

1.1    Law 1.1 - Number of Players

Law 1.1 shall be replaced by the following:

A match is played between two sides. Each side shall consist of 11 players, one of whom shall be captain.

1.2    Law 1.2 - Nomination of Players

Law 1.2 shall be replaced by the following:

1.2.1  Each captain shall nominate 11 players plus a maximum of 4 substitute fielders in writing to the ICC Match Referee before the toss. No player (member of the playing eleven) may be changed after the nomination without the consent of the opposing captain.

1.2.2  Only those nominated as substitute fielders shall be entitled to act as substitute fielders during the match, unless the ICC Match Referee, in exceptional circumstances, allows subsequent additions.

1.2.3 A player or player support personnel who has been suspended from participating in a match shall not, from the toss of the coin and for the remainder of the match thereafter:

a) Be nominated as, or carry out any of the duties or responsibilities of a substitute fielder, or

b) Enter any part of the playing area (which shall include the field of play and the area between the boundary and the perimeter boards) at any time, in-cluding any scheduled or unscheduled breaks in play.

A player who has been suspended from participating in a match shall be permitted from the toss of the coin and for the remainder of the match thereaf-ter be permitted to enter the players' dressing room provided that the players' dressing room (or any part thereof) for the match is not within the playing area described in b) above (for example, the player is not permitted to enter the on-field ‘dug-out’).

1.2.4  All those nominated including those nominated as substitute fielders, must be eligible to play for that particular team and by such nomination the nominees shall warrant that they are so eligible.

1.2.5  In addition, by their nomination, the nominees shall be deemed to have agreed to abide by all the applicable ICC Regulations pertaining to international cricket and in particular, the Clothing and Equipment Regulations, the Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel (hereafter referred to as the ICC Code of Conduct), the Anti-Racism Code for Players and Player Support Personnel, the Anti-Doping Code and the Anti-Corruption Code.

1.3    Law 1.3 – Captain

The following shall apply in addition to Law 1.3 (a):

The deputy must be one of the nominated members of the playing eleven. Each team must nominate its captain for the event to the ICC.

If the captain plays in a match without being the nominated captain for that match, he will be deemed to be the captain should any penalties be applied for over rate breaches under the Code of Conduct, unless the captain is off the field for wholly acceptable reasons for the entirety of his team’s fielding innings.

2    LAW 2 - SUBSTITUTES AND RUNNERS, BATSMAN OR FIELDER LEAVING THE FIELD, BATSMAN RETIRING, BATSMAN COMMENCING INNINGS

Law 2 shall apply subject to the following:

2.1    Law 2.1 Substitutes and Runners

Law 2.1 (a) (ii), 2.7 and 2.8 shall not apply. A runner for a batsman when batting is not permitted. Law 2.1 (b) shall be amended as follows:

The umpires shall have discretion to allow, for other wholly acceptable reasons, a substitute fielder to act for a nominated player, at the start of the match, or at any subsequent time.

2.2    Law 2.5 - Fielder absent or leaving the field

Law 2.5 shall be replaced by the following:

If a fielder fails to take the field with his side at the start of the match or at any later time, or leaves the field during a session of play, the umpire shall be informed of the reason for his absence, and he shall not thereafter come on to the field during a session of play without the consent of the umpire. (See Law 2.6 as modified). The umpire shall give such consent as soon as practicable.

If the player is absent from the field for longer than 8 minutes, the following restrictions shall apply to their future participation in the match:

2.2.1 The player shall not be permitted to bowl in the match until he has either been able to field, or his team has subsequently been batting, for the total length of playing time for which he was absent (hereafter referred to as penance time), subject to a maximum cumulative penance time of 120 minutes. If any unexpired penance time remains at the end of the first innings, it is carried forward to the second innings of the match.

2.2.2 The player shall not be permitted to bat in the match until his team's batting innings has been in progress for the length of playing time that is equal to the unexpired penance time carried forward from the previous innings, subject to a maximum cumulative penance time of 120 minutes. However, once his side has lost five wickets in its batting innings, he may bat immediately.

For the purposes of 2.2.1 and 2.2.2, playing time shall comprise the time play is in progress excluding intervals between innings and official drinks in-tervals.

However, in the event of a batsman or a fieldsman already being off the field at the commencement of an interruption in play through ground, weather or light conditions or for other exceptional circumstances, he shall be allowed to count any such stoppage time as playing time, provided that he per-sonally informs the umpires when he is fit enough to take the field had play been in progress.

Similarly, if at the commencement of an interruption in play through ground, weather or light conditions or for other exceptional circumstances, a player

is on the field but still has some unexpired penance time remaining from a previous absence, he shall automatically be allowed to count any such stop-page time as playing time, provided he returns to the field of play immediately after the interruption.

The restriction in clauses 2.2.1 and 2.2.2 above shall not apply if the player has suffered an external blow (as opposed to an internal injury such as a pulled muscle) whilst participating earlier in the match and consequently been forced to leave the field. Nor shall it apply if the player has been absent for very exceptional and wholly acceptable reasons (other than injury or illness).

2.2.3  Substitute fielders shall only be permitted in cases of injury, illness or other wholly acceptable reasons. ‘Wholly acceptable reasons’ should be limited to extreme circumstances and should not include what is commonly referred to as a ‘comfort break’.

Note: Squad members of the fielding team who are not playing in the match and who are not acting as substitute fielders shall be required to wear a team training bib whilst on the playing area (including the area between the boundary and the perimeter fencing).

3LAW 3 - THE UMPIRES

3.1    Law 3.1 - Appointment and attendance

Law 3.1 shall be replaced by the following:

The following rules for the selection and appointment of umpires shall be followed as far as it is practicable to do so:

3.1.1  The umpires shall control the game as required by the Laws (as read with these playing conditions), with absolute impartiality and shall be present at the ground at least two hours before the scheduled start of play.

3.1.2  ICC shall appoint umpires for on-field, third umpire and fourth umpire duties. The third umpire and fourth umpire shall act as emergency on-field umpire and third umpire.

3.1.3  The ICC shall appoint the match referee for all matches (ICC Match Referee).

3.1.4  The umpires in a match shall not be from the same country as the participating teams and shall be selected from the ICC ‘Elite Panel’ or the ICC ‘International Panel’.

3.1.5  The ICC Match Referee shall not be from the same country as the participating teams.

3.1.6 Neither team will have a right of objection to an umpire’s or match referee’s appointment.

3.2    Decision Review System

The DRS will be used in all matches.

The playing conditions set out in Appendix 6 shall apply.

3.3   Law 3.2 - Change of umpire

Law 3.2 shall be replaced by the following:

An umpire shall not be changed during the match, other than in exceptional circumstances, unless he is injured or ill.

3.4    Law 3.4 - To inform captains and scorers

The following shall apply in addition to Law 3.4 (i):

The Ground Authority may provide for the ringing of a bell, which shall be rung 5 minutes before the termination of an interval, when the umpires shall go to the wickets. The Ground Authority shall inform the ICC Match Referee and the Manager of the competing teams that this practice is to be adopted.

3.5    Law 3.8 - Fitness for play and Law 3.9 - Suspension of play in dangerous or unreasonable conditions

3.5.1  The safety of all persons within the ground is of paramount importance to the ICC. In the event that any threatening circumstance, whether actual or perceived, comes to the attention of any umpire (including for example weather, pitch invasions, act of God, etc. See also clauses 3.5.4 and 3.5.5 below), then the players and officials should immediately be asked to leave the field of play in a safe and orderly manner and to relocate to a secure and safe area (depending on each particular threat) pending the satisfactory passing or resolution of such threat or risk to the reasonable satisfaction of the umpires, ICC Match Referee, the head of the relevant ground authority, the head of ground security and/or the police as the circumstances may require.

Laws 3.8 & 3.9 shall be replaced by:

3.5.2  The umpires shall be the final judges of the fitness of the ground, weather and light for play. See clause 3.5.3 below and Law 7.2 (Fitness of the pitch for play).

3.5.3  Suspension of play for adverse conditions of ground, weather or light

a)    All references to ground include the pitch. See Law 7.1 (Area of pitch).

b)    If at the umpires together agree, that the conditions of ground, weather or light are so bad that there is obvious and foreseeable risk to the safety of any player or umpire, so that it would be unreasonable or dangerous for play to take place, then they shall immediately suspend play, or not allow play to commence or to restart. The decision as to whether conditions are so bad as to warrant such action is one for the umpires alone to make, following consultation with the ICC Match Referee.

The fact that the grass and the ball are wet and slippery does not warrant the ground conditions being regarded as unreasonable or dangerous. If the umpires consider the ground is so wet or slippery as to deprive the bowler of a reasonable foothold, the fielders of the power of free movement, or the batsmen of the ability to play their strokes or to run between the wickets, then these conditions shall be regarded as so bad that it would be unreasonable for play to take place.

If circumstances are warranted, the umpires shall stop play and instruct the ground staff to take whatever action they can and use whatever equipment is necessary to remove as much dew as possible from the outfield when conditions become unreasonable or dangerous. The umpires may also instruct the ground staff to take such action during scheduled and unscheduled breaks in play.

The umpires shall disregard any shadow on the pitch from the stadium or from any permanent object on the ground.

c)    When there is a suspension of play it is the responsibility of the umpires to monitor the conditions. They shall make inspections as often as appropriate. Immediately the umpires together agree that conditions are suitable for play they shall call upon the players to resume the game.

d)    If play is in progress up to the start of an agreed interval then it will resume after the interval unless the umpires together agree that the conditions of ground, weather or light are so bad that there is obvious and foreseeable risk to the safety of any player or umpire, so that it would be unreasonable or dangerous for play to take place.

3.5.4  Play may be suspended due to safety and security concerns by the umpires on the advice of the ICC Match Referee, the head of the relevant ground authority, the head of ground security or the police.

3.5.5  Where play is suspended under Clause 3.5.4 above the decision to abandon or resume play shall be the responsibility of the ICC Match Referee who shall act only after consultation with the head of ground security and the police.

3.6    Light Meters

3.6.1  It is the responsibility of the ICC to supply light meters to the match officials to be used in accordance with these playing conditions.

3.6.2  All light meters shall be uniformly calibrated.

3.6.3  The umpires shall be entitled to use light meter readings as a guideline for determining whether the light is fit for play in accordance with the criteria set out in clause 3.5.3 (b) above.

3.6.4  Light meter readings may accordingly be used by the umpires:

a)    To determine whether there has been at any stage a deterioration or improvement in the light.

b)    As benchmarks for the remainder of a match.

3.7    Use of artificial lights (at venues where lights are available)

If in the opinion of the umpires, natural light is deteriorating to an unfit level, they shall authorize the ground authorities to use any available artificial lighting so that the match can continue in acceptable conditions.

In the event of power failure or lights malfunction, the provisions relating to the delay or interruption of play due to bad weather or light shall apply.

3.8    Day Night matches

3.8.1  Pads and players’ and umpires’ clothing shall be coloured in all matches and shall comply with the provisions and specifications contained in the Members Participation Agreement (MPA).

3.8.2  Sight screens will be black.

3.9    Advertising on grounds, perimeter boards and sightscreens

3.9.1  Advertising on grounds

The logos on outfields are to be positioned as follows:

a)    Behind the stumps – a minimum of 25.15 yards (23 meters) from the stumps.

b)    Midwicket/cover area – no advertising to be positioned within the 30 yard (27.50 meters) circle.

3.9.2  Perimeter Boards

a)    Advertising on perimeter boards placed in front of the sightscreens is permitted save that the predominant colour of such advertising shall be of a contrasting colour to that of the ball.

b)    Advertising on perimeter boards behind the stumps at both ends shall not contain moving, flashing or flickering images and operators should ensure that the images are only changed or moved at a time that will not be distracting to the players or the umpires.

c)    In addition, the brightness of any electronic images shall be set at a level so that it is not a distraction to the players or umpires.

3.9.3  Sightscreens

a)    Sightscreens shall be provided at both ends of all grounds.

b)    Advertising shall be permitted on the sightscreen behind the striker, providing it is removed for the subsequent over from that end.

c)    Such advertising shall not contain flashing or flickering images and particular care should be taken by the operators that the advertising is not changed at a time which is distracting to the umpire.

4    LAW 4 - THE SCORERS

Law 4 shall apply.


5    LAW 5 - THE BALL

5.1    Law 5.2 - Approval and control of balls

Law 5.2 shall be replaced by the following:

5.1.1  White 'Kookaburra Turf' cricket balls supplied by ICC will be used in all matches. A minimum of 12 spare balls of the same brand will be supplied for changing during a match.

The fielding captain or his nominee may select the balls with which he wishes to bowl from the supply provided by the ICC. The fourth umpire shall take a box containing at least 6 new balls to the dressing room and supervise the selection of the balls.

The umpires shall retain possession of the match ball(s) throughout the duration of the match when play is not actually taking place. During play umpires shall periodically and irregularly inspect the condition of the balls and shall retain possession of them at the fall of a wicket, a drinks interval, or any other disruption in play.

5.1.2  Each fielding team shall have two new balls for its innings, to be used in alternate overs, i.e. one from each end.

5.1.3  In a match reduced to 25 overs or less per side before the first innings commences, each team shall have only one new ball for its Innings.

5.2    Law 5.4 - New ball in match of more than one day’s duration

Law 5.4 shall not apply.

5.3    Law 5.5 - Ball lost or becoming unfit for play

Law 5.5 shall be replaced by the following:

5.3.1  In the event of a ball during play being lost or in the opinion of the umpires, being unfit for play through normal use, the umpires shall allow it to be replaced by one that in their opinion has had a similar amount of wear.

5.3.2  In the event of the ball becoming wet and soggy as a result of play continuing in inclement weather or it being affected by dew, and in the opinion of the umpires being unfit for play, the ball may be replaced for a ball that has similar amount of wear, even though it has not gone out of shape.

5.3.3  If the ball is to be replaced, the umpire shall inform the batsmen and the fielding captain. Either batsman or bowler may raise the matter with the umpires and the umpires’ decision as to a replacement or otherwise will be final.

5.4    Law 5.6 - Specifications

Law 5.6 shall not apply.


6    LAW 6 - THE BAT

The following shall apply in addition to Law 6:

Only Type A bats shall be used in One Day International matches.

7    LAW 7 - THE PITCH

7.1    Law 7.3 - Selection and preparation

The following will apply in addition to Law 7.3:

7.1.1  The ground staff shall ensure that during the period prior to the start of play and during intervals, the pitch area shall be roped off so as to prevent unauthorised access. (The pitch area shall include an area at least 2 metres beyond the rectangle made by the crease markings at both ends of the pitch).

7.1.2  The fourth umpire shall ensure that, prior to the start of play and during any intervals, only authorised ground staff, the ICC match officials, players, team coaches and authorised television personnel shall be allowed access to the pitch area. Such access shall be subject to the following limitations:

a)    Only captains and team coaches may walk on the actual playing surface of the pitch area (outside of the crease markings).

b)    Access to the pitch area by television personnel shall be restricted to one camera crew (including one or two television commentators) of the official licensed television broadcaster(s) (but not news crews).

c)    No spiked footwear shall be permitted.

d)    No one shall be permitted to bounce a ball on the pitch, strike it with a bat or cause damage to the pitch in any other way.

e)    Access shall not interfere with pitch preparation.

7.1.3  In the event of any dispute, the ICC Match Referee will rule and his ruling will be final.

7.2    Law 7.4 - Changing the pitch

Law 7.4 shall be replaced by the following:

7.2.1  In the event of a pitch being considered too dangerous for play to continue in the estimation of the on-field umpires, they shall stop play and immediately advise the ICC Match Referee.

7.2.2  The on-field umpires and ICC Match Referee shall consult with both captains.

7.2.3  If the captains agree to continue, play shall resume.

7.2.4  If the decision is not to resume play, the on-field umpires together with the ICC Match Referee shall consider whether the existing pitch can be repaired and the match resumed from the point it was stopped. In considering whether to authorise such repairs, the ICC Match Referee must consider whether this would place either side at an unfair advantage, given the play that had already taken place on the dangerous pitch.

7.2.5  If the decision is that the existing pitch cannot be repaired, then the match is to be abandoned with the following consequences:

a)    In the event of the required number of overs to constitute a match having been completed at the time the match is abandoned, the result shall be determined according to the provisions of clause 21.7.2.

b)    In the event of the required number of overs to constitute a match not having been completed, the match will be abandoned as a no result.

7.2.6  If the match is abandoned as a no result, the ICC Match Referee shall consult with the the Event Technical Committee with the objective of finding a way for a new match to be commenced and completed on the same date (including any reserve day) and venue.

7.2.7  Such a match may be played either on the repaired pitch or on another pitch, subject to the ICC Match Referee and the relevant ground authority both being satisfied that the new pitch will be of the required ODI standard. The playing time lost between the scheduled start time of the original match and the actual start time of the new match will be covered by the provisions of clauses 12 and 16 below.

7.2.8  If it is not possible to play a new match on the scheduled day of the match (including any reserve day), the match will be abandoned (no result).

7.2.9  Throughout the above decision making processes, the ICC Match Referee shall keep informed both captains and the head of the ground authority. The head of the ground authority shall ensure that suitable and prompt public announcements are made.


7.3    Law 7.5 - Non-turf pitches

Law 7.5 shall not apply.

All matches shall be played on natural turf pitches. The use of PVA and other adhesives in the preparation of pitches is not permitted.


8    LAW 8 - THE WICKETS

8.1    Law 8.2 - Size of stumps

The following shall apply in addition to Law 8.2:

For televised matches the Broadcaster may provide a slightly larger cylindrical stump to accommodate the stump camera. When the larger stump is used, all three stumps must be exactly the same size.

8.2    Zing Wickets

The use of Zing wickets is permitted. Refer also to Appendix 6 clause 3.7 a).

9    LAW 9 - THE BOWLING, POPPING AND RETURN CREASES

9.1    Law 9.3 - The Popping Crease

Law 9.3 shall apply, except that the reference to ‘a minimum of 6 ft’ shall be replaced by ‘a minimum of 15 yards (13.71 metres)’.

9.2    Additional Crease Markings

The following shall apply in addition to Law 9:

As a guideline to the umpires for the calling of wides on the offside the crease markings detailed in Appendix 4 shall be marked in white at each end of the pitch.


10  LAW 10 - PREPARATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE PLAYING AREA

10.1  Law 10.1 - Rolling

The following shall apply in addition to Law 10.1:

10.1.1 Prior to tossing for choice of innings the artificial drying of the pitch and outfield shall be at the discretion of the ground curator. Thereafter and throughout the match the drying of the outfield may be undertaken at any time by the ground curator, but the drying of the affected area of the pitch shall be carried out only on the instructions and under the supervision of the umpires. The umpires shall be empowered to have the pitch dried without reference to the captains at any time they are of the opinion that it is unfit for play.

10.1.2 The umpires may instruct the ground curator to use any available equipment, including any roller for the purpose of drying the pitch and making it fit for play.

10.1.3 An absorbent roller may be used to remove water from the covers including the cover on the match pitch.

10.2  Law 10.6 - Maintenance of foot-holes

The following shall apply in addition to Law 10.6:

The umpires shall see that wherever possible and whenever it is considered necessary, action is taken during all intervals in play to do whatever is practicable to improve the bowler’s foot-holes.

10.3  Protection and preparation of adjacent pitches during matches

The protection (by way of an appropriate cover) and preparation of pitches which are adjacent to the match pitch will be permitted during the match subject to the following:

10.3.1 Such measures will only be possible if requested by the ground curator and approved by the umpires before the start of the match.

10.3.2 Approval should only be granted where such measures are unavoidable and will not compromise the safety of the players or their ability to execute their actions with complete freedom.

10.3.3 The preparation work shall be carried out under the supervision of the fourth umpire.

10.3.4 Any necessary watering shall be carried out only to the extent necessary for such preparations and shall not be permitted in circumstances which may in any way affect the match pitch.

10.3.5 The consent of the captains is not required but the umpires shall advise both captains and the ICC Match Referee before the start of the match on what has been agreed.

11  LAW 11 - COVERING THE PITCH

11.1  Law 11.1 - Before the match

The following shall apply in addition to Law 11.1:

The pitch shall be entirely protected against rain up to commencement of play.

11.2  Law 11.2 - During the match

Law 11.2 shall be replaced by the following:

The pitch shall be entirely protected against rain up to the commencement of play and for the duration of the period of the match.

The covers must totally protect the pitch and also the pitch surroundings, a minimum 5 metres either side of the pitch and any worn or soft areas in the outfield.

11.3  Law 11.3 - Covering bowlers’ run ups

Law 11.3 shall be replaced by the following:

The bowler’s run-ups shall be covered in inclement weather, in order to keep them dry, to a distance of at least 10 x 10 metres.

11.4  Law 11.4 - Removal of covers

Law 11.4 shall be replaced by the following:

All covers (including “hessian” or “scrim” covers used to protect the pitch against the sun) shall be removed not later than 21/2 hours before the scheduled start of play provided it is not raining at the time, but the pitch will be covered again if rain falls prior to the commencement of play.

Attention is drawn to clauses 3.5 and 10.3 above.


12  LAW 12 - INNINGS

Law 12 shall apply subject to the following (see also clauses 15 and 16 below):

12.1  Law 12.1 - Number of innings

Law 12.1 shall be replaced by the following:

a)      All matches will consist of one innings per side, each innings being limited to a maximum of 50 overs.

b)      All matches shall be of one day’s scheduled duration.

c)      There shall be no reserve day for all Group matches.

d)      There shall be one reserve day allocated to the quarter-finals, semi-finals and final on which an incomplete match shall be continued from the scheduled day.

e)      Every effort will be made to complete the match on the scheduled day with any necessary reduction in overs taking place and only if the minimum number of overs necessary to constitute a match cannot be bowled on the scheduled day will the match be completed on the reserve day.

f)      If the match has started on the scheduled day and overs are subsequently reduced following an interruption, but no further play is possible, the match will resume on the reserve day at the point where the last ball was played. Refer Appendix 8.


12.2  Law 12.2 - Alternate innings

Law 12.2 shall not apply.

12.3  Law 12.3 - Completed innings

Laws 12.3 (c), (d) and (e) (iii) shall not apply.


12.4  Length of Innings

12.4.1 Uninterrupted Matches.

a)    Each team shall bat for 50 overs unless all out earlier.

b)    If the team fielding first fails to bowl the required number of overs by the scheduled time for cessation of the first innings, play shall continue until the required number of overs has been bowled. The interval shall be reduced to enable the second innings to commence at the scheduled time, subject to there being a minimum interval of 30 minutes. The team batting second shall receive its full quota of 50 overs irrespective of the number of overs it bowled in the scheduled time for the cessation of the first innings.

c)    If the team batting first is dismissed in less than 50 overs, the team batting second shall be entitled to bat for 50 overs.

d)    If the team fielding second fails to bowl 50 overs by the scheduled cessation time, the hours of play shall be extended until the required number of overs has been bowled or a result is achieved.

e)    Penalties shall apply for slow over rates (refer ICC Code of Conduct). 12.4.2 Delayed or Interrupted Matches

a)    Delay or Interruption to the Innings of the Team Batting First (see Appendix 2)

i)    When playing time has been lost the revised number of overs to be bowled in the match shall be based on a rate of 14.28 overs per hour, which is inclusive of the provision of drinks intervals, in the total remaining time available for play.

ii)   The revision of the number of overs should ensure, whenever possible, that both teams have the opportunity of batting for the same number of overs. The team batting second shall not bat for a greater number of overs than the first team unless the latter completed its innings in less than its allocated overs. To constitute a match, a minimum of 20 overs have to be bowled to the side batting second, subject to a result not being achieved earlier.

iii)  As soon as the total minutes of playing time remaining is less than the completed overs faced by Team 1 multiplied by 4.2, then the first innings is terminated and the provisions of 12.4.2 (b) below take effect.

iv)  A fixed time will be specified for the commencement of the interval, and also the close of play for the match, by applying a rate of 14.28 overs per hour. When calculating the length of playing time available for the match, or the length of either innings, the timing and duration of all relative delays, extensions in playing hours, interruptions in play, and intervals, excluding those for drinks, will be taken into consideration. This calculation must not cause the match to finish earlier than the original or rescheduled time for cessation of play on the final scheduled day for play. If required the original time shall be extended to allow for one extra over for each team.

v)   If the team fielding first fails to bowl the revised number of overs by the specified time, play shall continue until the required number of overs have been bowled or the innings is completed.

vi)  Penalties shall apply for slow over rates (refer to ICC Code of Conduct).

b)    Delay or Interruption to the innings of the Team Batting Second (see Appendix 3)

i)    When playing time has been lost and, as a result, it is not possible for the team batting second to have the opportunity of receiving its allocated, or revised allocation of overs in the playing time available, the number of overs shall be reduced at a rate of 14.28 overs per hour, which is inclusive of the provision of drinks intervals, in respect of the lost playing time. Should the calculations result in a fraction of an over the fraction shall be ignored.

ii)   In addition, should the innings of the team batting first have been completed prior to the scheduled, or re-scheduled time for the commencement of the interval, then any calculation relating to the revision of overs shall not be effective until an amount of time equivalent to that by which the second innings started early has elapsed.

iii)  To constitute a match, a minimum of 20 overs have to be bowled to the team batting second subject to a result not being achieved earlier.

iv)  The team batting second shall not bat for a greater number of overs than the first team unless the latter completed its innings in less than its allocated overs.

v)   A fixed time will be specified for the close of play by applying a rate of 14.28 overs per hour. With the exception of drinks intervals, the timing and duration of all relative delays, extensions in playing hours and interruptions in play, will be taken into consideration in specifying this time.

vi)  If the team fielding second fails to bowl the revised overs by the scheduled or re-scheduled close of play, the hours of play shall be extended until the overs have been bowled or a result achieved.

vii) Penalties shall apply for slow over rates (refer ICC Code of Conduct).

12.5  Extra Time

Where the start is delayed or play is suspended, the scheduled hours of play shall be extended up to a maximum of 15 minutes per day (including on a reserve day).

Refer to the note in Appendix 8.

12.6  Number of Overs per Bowler

No bowler shall bowl more than 10 overs in an innings.

In a delayed or interrupted match where the overs are reduced for both teams or for the team bowling second, no bowler may bowl more than one-fifth of the total overs allowed.

Where the total overs is not divisible by 5, one additional over shall be allowed to the maximum number per bowler necessary to make up the balance.

In the event of a bowler breaking down and being unable to complete an over, the remaining balls will be allowed by another bowler. Such part of an over will count as a full over only in so far as each bowler’s limit is concerned.

The scoreboard shall show the total number of overs bowled and the number of overs bowled by each bowler.

12.7  Law 12.4 – The toss

Law 12.4 shall be replaced by the following:

The captains shall toss for the choice of innings, on the field of play and in the presence of the ICC Match Referee, who shall supervise the toss. The toss shall take place not earlier than 30 minutes, nor later than 15 minutes before the scheduled or any re-scheduled time for the match to start. Note, however, the provisions of Law 1.3 (Captain).

Note: Law 12.5 requiring the captain of the side winning the toss to notify the opposing captain as soon as the toss is completed of his decision to bat or to field first shall apply.

13  LAW 13 - THE FOLLOW-ON

Law 13 shall not apply.


14  LAW 14 - DECLARATION AND FORFEITURE


Law 14 shall not apply.

15  LAW 15 - INTERVALS

15.1  Law 15.5 - Changing agreed times for intervals - Interval between Innings

If the innings of the team batting first is completed prior to the scheduled time for the interval, the interval shall take place immediately and the innings of the team batting second will commence correspondingly earlier providing that this does not lead to an interval occurring more than 30 minutes prior to the scheduled interval.

If the innings of the team batting first is completed more than 30 minutes prior to the scheduled interval a 10 minute break will occur and the team batting second will commence its innings and the interval will occur as scheduled.

Where the innings of the side batting first is delayed or interrupted, the length of the interval will be reduced as follows:

i)    If up to 15 minutes of actual playing time is lost (total playing time lost less any extra time provided), then the interval will be reduced by the amount of actual playing time lost.

ii)   If more than 15 minutes of actual playing time is lost (total playing time lost less any extra time provided), then the interval will be reduced to 30 minutes (subject to (iii) below).

iii)  Note: The prescribed interval timings above may be reduced further by the ICC Match Referee taking into account the intention of not having a prolonged interval after a lengthy interruption close to the conclusion of the innings of the team batting first. However, the minimum interval shall not be less than ten minutes.

15.2  Law 15.9 - Intervals for drinks

Two drinks breaks per session shall be permitted, each 1 hour 10 minutes apart. The provisions of Law 15.9 shall be strictly observed except that under conditions of extreme heat the umpires may permit extra intervals for drinks.

An individual player may be given a drink either on the boundary edge or at the fall of a wicket, on the field, provided that no playing time is wasted. No other drinks shall be taken onto the field without the permission of the umpires. Any player taking drinks onto the field shall be dressed in proper cricket attire (subject to the wearing of bibs – refer to the note in clause 2.2.3).


16  LAW 16 - START OF PLAY; CESSATION OF PLAY

Law 16 shall apply subject to the following (see also clauses 15 and 12.4):

16.1   Start and Cessation Times
The match shall consist of 2 sessions of 3.5 hours each, separated by a 45 minute interval between innings.

Local Times:

Day Matches in Christchurch, Dunedin, Napier, Nelson, Wellington

First Session……………………….….. 11h00 – 14h30

Interval…………………..……………... 14h30 – 15h15

Second Session…………....…….…… 15h15 – 18h45

Day/Night Matches in Brisbane

First Session…………………….…….. 13h30 – 17h00

Interval……………………………..…... 17h00 – 17h45

Second Session……………..…..….… 17h45 – 21h15

Day/Night Matches in Adelaide, Auckland, Hamilton, Napier, Wellington

First Session……………………….….. 14h00 – 17h30

Interval…………………..……………... 17h30 – 18h15

Second Session…………....…….…… 18h15 – 21h45

Day/Night Matches in Canberra, Hobart, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney

First Session…………………….…….. 14h30 – 18h00

Interval……………………………..…... 18h00 – 18h45

Second Session……………..…..….… 18h45 – 22h15

16.2  Laws 16.6, 16.7 and 16.8 shall not apply.

16.3  Laws 16.9, 16.10, and 16.11 shall apply in so far as they are relevant to a one innings limited overs type match.

16.4  Minimum Over Rates

The minimum over rate to be achieved in the matches will be 14.28 overs per hour. The actual over rate will be calculated at the end of the match by the umpires.

In calculating the actual over rate for the match, allowances will be given for the actual time lost as a result of any of the following:

16.4.1  treatment given to a player by an authorised medical personnel on the field of play;

16.4.2  a player being required to leave the field as a result of a serious injury;

16.4.3  all third umpire referrals and consultations;

16.4.4  time wasting by the batting side; and

16.4.5  all other circumstances that are beyond the control of the fielding side.


In the event of any time allowances being granted to the fielding team under 16.4.4 above (time wasting by batting team), then such time shall be deducted from the allowances granted to such batting team in the determination of its over rate.

If a side is bowled out within the time determined for that innings pursuant to these playing conditions (taking into account all of the time allowances set out above), the fielding side shall be deemed to have complied with the required minimum over rate.

17  LAW 17 - PRACTICE ON THE FIELD

Law 17 shall apply subject to the following:

17.1  Law 17.1 - Practice on the pitch or the rest of the square

Law 17.1 shall apply subject to the following:

a)   The use of the square for practice on any day of any match will be restricted to any netted practice area or bowling strips specifically prepared on the edge of the square for that purpose.

b)   Bowling practice on the bowling strips referred to in (a) above shall also be permitted during the interval (and change of innings if not the interval) unless the umpires consider that, in the prevailing conditions of ground and weather, it will be detrimental to the surface of the square.

17.2  Law 17.3 - Practice on the outfield between the call of play and the call of time

Law 17.3 shall apply save that Law 17.3 (c) shall be replaced with the following:

c)   There shall be no bowling or batting practice on the outfield. Bowling a ball, using a short run up to a player in the outfield is not to be regarded as bowling practice but shall be subject to the law.


18  LAW 18 - SCORING RUNS

Law 18 shall apply.


19  LAW 19 - BOUNDARIES

Law 19 shall apply subject to the following:

19.1  Law 19.1 - The boundaries of the field of play

The following shall apply in addition to Law 19.1:

In all cases the aim shall be to provide the largest playing area, subject to no boundary exceeding 90 yards (82.29 meters) from the centre of the pitch to be used.

19.2  Law 19.2 - Defining the boundary - boundary marking

The following shall apply in addition to Law 19.2:

All boundaries must be designated by a rope or similar object of a minimum standard as authorised by the ICC from time to time. Where appropriate the rope should be a required minimum distance (3 yards [2.74 metres] minimum) inside the perimeter fencing or advertising signs. For grounds with a large playing area, the maximum length of boundary should be used before applying the minimum 3 yards (2.74 meters) between the boundary and the fence.

19.3  Law 19.3 - Scoring a boundary

The following shall apply in addition to Law 19.3:

If an unauthorized person enters the playing arena and handles the ball, the umpire at the bowler’s end shall be the sole judge of whether the boundary allowance should be scored or the ball be treated as still in play or called dead ball if a batsman is liable to be out as a result of the unauthorized person handling the ball. See also Law 19.1 (c).


20  LAW 20 - LOST BALL

Law 20 shall apply.


21  LAW 21 - THE RESULT

Law 21 shall apply subject to the following:

21.1  Law 21.1 - A win - two innings match

Law 21.1 shall not apply.

21.2  Law 21.2 - A win - one innings match

Law 21.2 shall apply in addition to the following:

21.2.1 Save for circumstances where a match is awarded to a team as a consequence of the opposing team’s refusal to play (Law 21.3), a result can be achieved only if both teams have had the opportunity of batting for at least 20 overs, unless one team has been all out in less than 20 overs or unless the team batting second scores enough runs to win in less than 20 overs.

21.2.2 Save for circumstances where a match is awarded to a team as a consequence of the opposing team’s refusal to play (Law 21.3), all matches in which both teams have not had an opportunity of batting for a minimum of 20 overs, shall be declared no result.

21.3  Law 21.3 – Umpire (ICC Match Referee) awarding a match

Law 21.3 shall be replaced by the following:

a)   A match shall be lost by a side which either

i)    concedes defeat or

ii)   in the opinion of the ICC Match Referee refuses to play and the ICC Match Referee shall award the match to the other side.

b)   If an umpire considers that an action by any player or players might constitute a refusal by either side to play then the umpires together shall inform the ICC Match Referee of this fact. The ICC Match Referee shall together with the umpires ascertain the cause of the action. If the ICC Match Referee, after due consultation with the umpires, then decides that this action does constitute a refusal to play by one side, he shall so inform the captain of that side. If the captain persists in the action the ICC Match Referee shall award the match in accordance with (a)(ii) above.*

c)   If action as in (b) above takes place after play has started and does not constitute a refusal to play the delay or interruption in play shall be dealt with in the same manner as provided for in clauses 12.4.2 and 15.1 above.

* N/B In addition to the consequences of any refusal to play prescribed under this clause, any such refusal, whether temporary or final, may result in

disciplinary action being taken against the captain and team responsible under the Code of Conduct

21.4  Law 21.4 – Matches in which there is an agreement under Law 12.1 (b)

Law 21.4 shall not apply.

21.5  Law 21.5 (a) - A Tie

The following shall apply in addition to Law 21.5 (a):

If the scores are equal, the result shall be a tie and no account shall be taken of the number of wickets which have fallen. In the Group stage, points are allocated for a tie as per clause 21.10.

In all subsequent matches, refer to clauses 21.10.2, 21.10.3 and 21.10.4.

21.6  Law 21.5 (b) - A Draw

Law 21.5 (b) shall not apply.

21.7  Prematurely Terminated Matches - Calculation of the Target Score

21.7.1         Interrupted Matches - Calculation of the Target Score

If, due to suspension of play after the start of the match, the number of overs in the innings of either team has to be revised to a lesser number than originally allotted (minimum of 20 overs), then a revised target score (to win) should be set for the number of overs which the team batting second will have the opportunity of facing. This revised target is to be calculated using the current Duckworth/Lewis method. The target set will always be a whole number and one run less will constitute a Tie. (Refer Duckworth/Lewis Regulations)

21.7.2         Prematurely Terminated Matches

If the innings of the side batting second is suspended (with at least 20 overs bowled) and it is not possible for the match to be resumed, the match will be decided by comparison with the D/L ‘Par Score’ determined at the instant of the suspension by the Duckworth/Lewis method (refer Duckworth/Lewis Regulations). If the score is equal to the par score, the match is a Tie. Otherwise the result is a victory, or defeat, by the margin of runs by which the score exceeds, or falls short of, the Par Score.

21.8  Law 21.8 - Correctness of result

Any query on the result of the match as defined in Laws 21.2, 21.3, 21.5, 21.8 and 21.10 (as modified by these regulations) shall be resolved as soon as possible and a final decision made by the umpires at close of play.

21.9   Competition Format

The ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 will be contested by 14 teams which have been ‘seeded’ and divided into two Pools:

Pool A                             Pool B

England (1)                        South Africa (2)
Australia (4)                       India (3)

Sri Lanka (5)                       Pakistan (6)
Bangladesh (8)                    West Indies (7)
New Zealand (9)                   Zimbabwe (10)
Afghanistan (12)                   Ireland (11)
Scotland (13)                      United Arab Emirates (14)

The first round of the competition will be the Pool stage.

Each team will play every other team in their Pool. Points will be allocated for each match in accordance with the system described in clause 21.10.1 of these playing conditions, which will apply throughout the competition.

Following the Pool stage the top 4 teams in each Pool will progress to the quarter-finals as follows:

Quarter-final 1         A1 v B4
Quarter-final 2         A2 v B3
Quarter-final 3         A3 v B2
Quarter-final 4         A4 v B1

The winners of the quarter-finals will qualify for the semi-finals as follows:

Semi Final 1           Winner QF 1 v Winner QF 3
Semi Final 2           Winner QF 2 v Winner QF 4

The winners of the semi-finals will contest the Final.

21.10                 Progression of Teams

21.10.1      Pool Matches

The following point system will apply:

Win
2
Tie, No Result or Abandoned
1
Loss
0

In the event of teams finishing on equal points in its Pool, the right to play in the quarter-finals will be decided in the following order of priority:

·        The team with the most wins in the Pool matches will be placed in the higher position.

·        If there are teams with equal points and equal wins in the Pool matches then in such case the team with the higher net run rate in the Pool matches will be placed in the higher position (refer to 21.10.5 below for the calculation of net run rate).

·        If two or more teams are still equal, they will be ordered according to the head to head matches played between them (points then net run rate in those matches).

·        In the highly unlikely event that teams cannot be separated by the above, teams will be ordered according to their original seed-ing.

·        If all matches within a Pool are a no result, the top four seeded teams will progress to the quarter-finals.


21.10.2      Quarter Final

·        If a quarter-final is tied, abandoned or if the match is a no result, then the team that finished in the higher position in the Pool stage shall proceed to the semi-finals.

21.10.3      Semi Final

·        If a semi-final is tied, abandoned or if the match is a no result, then the team that finished in the higher position in the Pool stage shall proceed to the final.

21.10.4      Final

·        If the Final is tied, abandoned or if the match is a no result, then the teams will be declared joint winners.

21.10.5      Net Run Rate

A team’s net run rate is calculated by deducting from the average runs per over scored by that team throughout the competition, the average runs per over scored against that team throughout the competition.

In the event of a team being all out in less than its full quota of overs, the calculation of its net run rate shall be based on the full quota of overs to which it would have been entitled and not on the number of overs in which the team was dismissed.

Only those matches where results are achieved will count for the purpose of net run rate calculations. Where a match is abandoned, but a result is achieved under Duckworth/Lewis, for net run rate purposes Team 1 will be accredited with Team 2’s Par Score on abandonment off the same number of overs faced by Team 2.

Where a match is concluded but with Duckworth/Lewis having been applied at an earlier point in the match, Team 1 will be accredited with 1 run less than the final Target Score for Team 2 off the total number of overs allocated to Team 2 to reach the target.

In circumstances where a match (and the points for such match) is awarded to a team as a result of the other team’s refusal to play, either by the umpires in accordance with Law 21.3 (a)(ii) or in accordance with the provisions of the relevant event agreements signed by the participating teams, the net run rate of the defaulting team shall be affected in that the full 50 overs of the defaulting team’s innings in such forfeited match shall be taken into account in calculating the average runs per over of the defaulting team over the course of the relevant portion of the competition. For the avoidance of doubt the runs scored and overs bowled in such forfeited match will not be taken into account when calculating the net run rate of the team to whom the match was awarded.


22  LAW 22 - THE OVER

Law 22 shall apply subject to the following:

22.1  Law 22.5 - Umpire miscounting

The following shall apply in addition to Law 22.5:

Whenever possible the third umpire shall liaise with the scorers and if possible inform the on-field umpires if the over has been miscounted.


23  LAW 23 - DEAD BALL

Law 23 shall apply subject to the addition of the following to Law 23.4.

23.1  Law 23.4 – Umpire calling and signalling ‘Dead Ball’

In a match where cameras are being used on or over the field of play (e.g. Spydercam), should a ball that has been hit by the batsman make contact, while still in play, with the camera, its apparatus or its cable, either umpire shall call and signal ‘dead ball’. The ball shall not count as one of the over and no runs shall be scored. If the delivery was called a no ball it shall count and the no ball penalty applied, including if appropriate a free hit from the next delivery. No other runs (including penalty runs) apart from the no ball penalty shall be scored.

Should a ball thrown by a fielder make contact with a camera on or over the field of play, its apparatus or its cable, either umpire shall call and signal dead ball. Unless this was already a no-ball or wide, the ball shall count as one of the over. All runs scored to that point shall count, plus the run in progress if the batsmen have already crossed.


24  LAW 24 - NO BALL

Law 24 shall apply subject to the following:

24.1  Law 24.1 (b) - Mode of delivery

Law 24.1 (b) shall be replaced by the following:

The bowler may not deliver the ball underarm. If a bowler bowls a ball underarm the umpire shall call and signal no ball, and the ball is to be re-bowled overarm.

24.2  Free Hit after a foot-fault no ball

In addition to the above, the delivery following a no ball called for a foot fault (Law 24.5) shall be a free hit for whichever batsman is facing it. If the delivery for the free hit is not a legitimate delivery (any kind of no ball or a wide ball) then the next delivery will become a free hit for whichever batsman is facing it.

For any free hit, the striker can be dismissed only under the circumstances that apply for a no ball, even if the delivery for the free hit is called wide ball.

Field changes are not permitted for free hit deliveries unless there is a change of striker (the provisions of clause 41.2 shall apply).

The umpires will signal a free hit by (after the normal No Ball signal) extending one arm straight upwards and moving it in a circular motion.

24.3  Fair Delivery - the feet

Law 24.5 shall apply, subject to the final paragraph being replaced by the following:

If the bowler’s end umpire is satisfied that any of these three conditions have not been met, he shall call and signal No ball.

25  LAW 25 - WIDE BALL

25.1  Law 25.1 - Judging a Wide

Law 25 shall apply with the following addition to Law 25.1:

Umpires are instructed to apply very strict and consistent interpretation in regard to this Law in order to prevent negative bowling wide of the wicket. Any offside or legside delivery which in the opinion of the umpire does not give the batsman a reasonable opportunity to score shall be called a wide.

A penalty of one run for a wide shall be scored. This penalty shall stand in addition to any other runs which are scored or awarded. All runs, which are run or result from a wide ball, which is not a no ball, shall be scored wide balls.


26  LAW 26 - BYE AND LEG BYE

Law 26 shall apply.


27  LAW 27 - APPEALS

Law 27 shall apply.


28  LAW 28 - THE WICKET IS DOWN

Law 28 shall apply.


29  LAW 29 - BATSMAN OUT OF HIS GROUND

Law 29 shall apply.


30  LAW 30 - BOWLED

Law 30 shall apply.


31  LAW 31 - TIMED OUT

Law 31 shall apply.

Refer also to clause 42.9 (Law 42.10).


32  LAW 32 - CAUGHT

Law 32 shall apply.


33  LAW 33 - HANDLED THE BALL

Law 33 shall apply.


34  LAW 34 - HIT THE BALL TWICE

Law 34 shall apply.


35  LAW 35 - HIT WICKET

Law 35 shall apply.


36  LAW 36 - LEG BEFORE WICKET

Law 36 shall apply.


37  LAW 37 - OBSTRUCTING THE FIELD

Law 37 shall apply. For the avoidance of doubt, if an umpire feels that a batsman, in running between the wickets, has significantly changed his direction without probable cause and thereby obstructed a fielder’s attempt to effect a run out, the batsman should, on appeal, be given out, obstructing the field. It shall not be rele-vant whether a run out would have occurred or not.

If the change of direction involves the batsman crossing the pitch, Law 42.14 shall also apply. See also paragraph 2.4 of Appendix 6.

38  LAW 38 - RUN OUT

Law 38 shall apply.


39  LAW 39 - STUMPED

Law 39 shall apply.


40  LAW 40 - THE WICKET-KEEPER

Law 40 shall apply.


41  LAW 41 – THE FIELDER

Law 41 shall apply subject to the following:

41.1  Law 41.1 - Protective equipment

The following shall apply in addition to Law 41.1:

The exchanging of protective equipment between members of the fielding side on the field shall be permitted provided that the umpires do not consider that it constitutes a waste of playing time.

41.2  Restrictions on the placement of fieldsmen

41.2.1 At the instant of delivery, there may not be more than 5 fieldsmen on the leg side.

41.2.2 In addition to the restriction contained in clause 41.2.1 above, further fielding restrictions shall apply to certain overs in each innings. The nature of such fielding restrictions and the overs during which they shall apply (hereinafter referred to as the Powerplay Overs) are set out in the following paragraphs.

41.2.3 The following fielding restrictions shall apply:

a)    Two semi-circles shall be drawn on the field of play. The semi-circles shall have as their centre the middle stump at either end of the pitch. The radius of each of the semi-circles shall be 30 yards (27.43 metres). The semi-circles shall be linked by two parallel straight lines drawn on the field. (Refer attached Appendix 5). The fielding restriction areas should be marked by continuous painted white lines or ‘dots’ at 5 yard (4.57 metres) intervals, each ‘dot’ to be covered by a white plastic or rubber (but not metal) disc measuring 7 inches (18 cm) in diameter.

During the first block of Powerplay Overs (as set out below), only two fieldsmen shall be permitted outside this fielding restriction area at the instant of delivery.

During the second block of Powerplay Overs only three fieldsmen shall be permitted outside this fielding restriction area at the instant of delivery.

b)    Two inner circles shall be drawn on the field of play. The circles shall have as their centres the centrepoint of the popping crease at either end of the pitch. The radius of each of the circles shall be 15 yards (13.72 metres). These fielding restriction areas should be marked by ‘dots’. The segment of the circles reserved for the slip positions shall not be demarcated (refer attached Appendix 5).

During the first block of Powerplay Overs (in an uninterrupted innings, the first 10), there must be a minimum of two stationary fieldsmen within the applicable fielding restriction area measured from the striker’s end at the instant of delivery. When a fast bowler is bowling the two stationary fieldsmen may be permitted to stand deeper than 15 yards (13.72 metres) (in the undemarcated area) provided only that they are standing in slip, leg slip or gully positions.

41.2.4 During the non Powerplay Overs, no more than four fieldsmen shall be permitted outside the fielding restriction area referred to in clause 41.2.3 (a) above.

41.2.5         Subject to the provisions of 41.2.6 below, the Powerplay Overs shall apply for 15 overs per innings to be taken as follows:

a)    The first block of Powerplay Overs (block of 10 overs for an uninterrupted match) shall be at the commencement of the innings.

b)    The second block of Powerplay Overs (block of 5 overs for an uninterrupted match) shall be taken at the discretion of either of the batsmen at the wicket. In an innings of scheduled duration of between 41 and 50 overs, it may not be completed later than the 40th over. (No equivalent restriction applies to innings of shorter scheduled duration.)

c)    A batsman must nominate his team’s Powerplay no later than the moment at which the umpire reaches the stumps at the bowler’s end for the start of the next over.

d)    Once a batsman has nominated a Powerplay, the decision cannot be reversed.

e)    Should the batting side choose not to exercise their discretion, their Powerplay Overs will automatically commence at the latest available point in the innings (e.g. in a 50 over innings, this will begin at the start of the 36th over).

41.2.6  In circumstances when the number of overs of the batting team is reduced, the number of Powerplay Overs shall be reduced in accordance with the table below. For the sake of clarity, it should be noted that the table shall apply to both the 1st and 2nd innings of the match.




INNINGS
FIRST
SECOND
POWERPLAY




DURATION
POWERPLAY
POWERPLAY
TOTAL








20 – 21
4
2
6
22 – 24
5
2
7
25 – 28
5
3
8
29 – 31
6
3
9
32 – 34
7
3
10
35 – 38
7
4
11
39 – 41
8
4
12
42 – 44
9
4
13
45 – 48
9
5
14






49              10               5                15

41.2.7  Each block of Powerplay Overs must commence at the start of an over.

41.2.8  If play is interrupted not during the Powerplay overs, then on resumption, it is necessary to determine how any remaining Powerplay overs should be allocated. The total number of Powerplay overs for the innings is derived from the table in 41.2.6. Any Powerplay overs already taken prior to the interruption will be deemed to have been from the initial allocation followed by the batting side’s allocation. The decision of the batting side of when to take any remaining Powerplay overs is made in the usual way.

Illustrations of 41.2.8:

A match starts as 50 overs, is interrupted after 12 overs and reduced to 43 overs. (The first 10 overs have been Powerplays (PP); the next two were not.) The new PP allocation is 9+4, so there are 3 overs left for the batting side. These must start no later than the 38th over in order to be completed by the 40th over.

41.2.9  If play is interrupted during the first Powerplay and on resumption the overs required to be bowled in that Powerplay have already been exceeded, then the second Powerplay will be assumed to have been taken immediately and will continue until it is completed.

Illustrations of 41.2.9

A 50 over innings is interrupted after 9.3 overs, and on resumption has been reduced to 43 overs. Powerplay overs are 9+4. 2nd Powerplay is in progress with 0.3 out of the 4 overs completed, i.e. it covers overs 10 to 13. The fielding restrictions relating to the second powerplay take immediate effect on resumption.

41.2.10If following an interruption, on resumption the total number of Powerplay Overs for the innings has already been exceeded, then there will be no further Powerplay deliveries bowled in the innings. Note that this is the only circumstance under which the Powerplay status can be changed during an over.

Illustrations of 41.2.10

A 45 over innings is interrupted after 8.3 overs, and on resumption has been reduced to 28 overs. Powerplay overs are 5+3. All Powerplay overs have been completed. Non-Powerplay restrictions take effect immediately and do not need to wait until the end of the over.

41.2.11If following an interruption while a Powerplay is not in progress, it is found on resumption that the recalculated number of Powerplay Overs remaining exceeds the number of overs to be bowled in the innings, then the Powerplays will commence at the start of the next over, with fewer than the scheduled number of Powerplay Overs being bowled in the innings.

Illustration of 41.2.11:

A 41 over innings in which only the 1st Powerplay has been taken is interrupted after 35.1 overs and reduced to 39 overs. Powerplay overs are still 8+4. Powerplays automatically resume for the start of the next over, but only 11 of the 12 scheduled Powerplay overs can be bowled in the innings.

41.2.12At the commencement of the second block of Powerplay Overs, the umpire shall signal such commencement to the scorers by rotating his arm in a large circle.

41.2.13       The umpire shall also indicate to the fielding captain before any signal is made that the batting side has chosen its Powerplay.

41.2.14A light or other indicator shall be displayed on the scoreboard whenever the Powerplay Overs are being bowled, along with the number of overs remaining in the current block of Powerplay Overs.

41.2.15       The public address system shall be used to keep the

spectators informed.

41.2.16       In the event of an infringement of any of the above fielding restrictions, the square leg umpire shall call and signal ‘No Ball’.

42  LAW 42 - FAIR AND UNFAIR PLAY

42.1  Law 42.3 - The Match Ball - changing its condition

Law 42.3 shall apply, subject to the following:

Law 42.3 (d) and (e) shall be replaced with the following:

If the umpires together agree that the deterioration of the ball is inconsistent with the use it has received, they shall consider that there has been a contravention of this Law. They shall then decide together whether they can identify the player(s) responsible for such conduct.

42.1.1 If it is possible to identify the player(s) responsible:

a)    Change the ball forthwith. The batsman at the wicket shall choose the replacement ball from a selection of six other balls of various degrees of usage (including a new ball) and of the same brand as the ball in use prior to the contravention.

Additionally the bowler’s end umpire shall:

b)    Award 5 penalty runs to the batting side.

c)    Inform the captain of the fielding side of the reason for the action taken.

d)    Inform the captain of the batting side as soon as practicable of what has occurred.

e)    Together with the other umpire report the incident to the ICC Match Referee who shall take action as is appropriate against the player(s) responsible for the conduct under the ICC Code of Conduct.

42.1.2 If it is not possible to identify the player(s) responsible:

a)    Change the ball forthwith. The umpires shall choose the replacement ball for one of similar wear and of the same brand as the ball in use prior to the contravention.

b)    The bowler’s end umpire shall issue the captain with a first and final warning, and

c)    Advise him that should there be any further incident by that team during the remainder of the match or event, steps 42.1.1 a) to e) above will be adopted, with the captain deemed under e) to be the player responsible.

42.2  Law 42.4 - Deliberate attempt to distract striker

Law 42.4 shall apply subject to the following:

In addition, the umpires shall report the incident to the ICC Match Referee under the ICC Code of Conduct.

42.3  Law 42.5 - Deliberate distraction or obstruction of batsman

Law 42.5 shall apply subject to the following:

In addition, the umpire shall report the incident to the ICC Match Referee under the ICC Code of Conduct.

42.4  Law 42.6 - Dangerous and Unfair Bowling

42.4.1         Law 42.6 (a) - The Bowling of Fast Short Pitched Balls

Law 42.6 (a) shall be replaced by the following:

a)    A bowler shall be limited to two fast short-pitched deliveries per over.

b)    A fast short-pitched delivery is defined as a ball which passes or would have passed above the shoulder height of the striker standing upright at the popping crease.

c)    The umpire at the bowlers end shall advise the bowler and the batsman on strike when each fast short pitched delivery has been bowled.

d)    In addition, for the purpose of this regulation and subject to Clause 42.4.1 (f) below, a ball that passes above head height of the batsman, that prevents him from being able to hit it with his bat by means of a normal cricket stroke shall be called a wide.

e)    For the avoidance of doubt any fast short pitched delivery that is called a wide under this playing condition shall also count as one of the allowable short pitched deliveries in that over.

f)     In the event of a bowler bowling more than two fast short-pitched deliveries in an over as defined in Clause 42.4.1 (b) above, the umpire at the bowlers end shall call and signal no ball on each occasion. A differential signal shall be used to signify a fast short pitched delivery. The umpire shall call and signal ‘no ball’ and then tap the head with the other hand.

g)    If a bowler delivers a third fast short pitched ball in an over, the umpire, after the call of no ball and when the ball is dead, shall caution the bowler, inform the other umpire, the captain of the fielding side and the batsmen at the wicket of what has occurred. This caution shall apply throughout the innings.

h)    If there is a second instance of the bowler being no balled in the innings for bowling more than two fast short pitched deliveries in an over, the umpire shall advise the bowler that this is his final warning for the innings.

i)     Should there be any further instance by the same bowler in that innings, the umpire shall call and signal no ball and when the ball is dead direct the captain to take the bowler off forthwith.

If necessary, the over shall be completed by another bowler, who shall neither have bowled the previous over, or part thereof, nor be allowed to bowl the next over, or part thereof.

j)     The bowler thus taken off shall not be allowed to bowl again in that innings.

k)    The umpire will report the occurrence to the other umpire, the batsmen at the wicket and as soon as possible to the captain of the batting side.

l)     The umpires will then report the matter to the ICC Match Referee who shall take such action as is considered appropriate against the captain and the bowler concerned. (Refer also to Law 42.1 Fair and Unfair Play - Responsibility of the Captains.)

The above is not a substitute for Clause 42.5 below which umpires are able to apply at any time.

42.4.2 Law 42.6 (b) Bowling of High Full Pitched Balls Law 42.6 (b) shall be replaced by the following:

a)    Any delivery, which passes or would have passed on the full above waist height of the striker standing upright at the popping crease is deemed unfair, whether or not it is likely to inflict physical injury on the striker.

b)    In the event of a bowler bowling a high full pitched ball as defined in Clause 42.4.2 (a) above, the umpire at the bowler’s end shall call and signal no ball.

If, in the opinion of the umpire, such a delivery is considered likely to inflict physical injury on the batsman, the umpire at the bowler’s end shall, in addition to calling and signalling no ball, when the ball is dead, caution the bowler and issue a first and final warning. The umpire shall inform the other umpire, the captain of the fielding side and the batsmen at the wicket of what has occurred.

c)    Should there be any further instance (where a high full pitched ball is bowled and is considered likely to inflict physical injury on the batsman) by the same bowler in that innings, the umpire shall in addition to calling and signalling no ball, when the ball is dead, direct the captain to take the bowler off forthwith. If necessary, the over shall be completed by another bowler, who shall neither have bowled the previous over, or part thereof, nor be allowed to bowl the next over, or part thereof.

d)    The bowler thus taken off shall not be allowed to bowl again in that innings.

e)    The umpire will report the occurrence to the other umpire, the batsman at the wicket and as soon as possible to the captain of the batting side.

f)     The umpires will then report the matter to the ICC Match Referee who shall take such action as is considered appropriate against the captain and the bowler concerned. (Refer also to Law 42.1 Fair and Unfair Play - Responsibility of the Captains.)

42.5  Law 42.7 - Dangerous and Unfair Bowling - Action by the umpire

Law 42.7 shall be replaced by the following:

Regardless of any action taken by the umpire as a result of a breach of Clauses 42.4.1, 42.4.2 and 42.6 the following shall apply at any time during the match:

42.5.1 The bowling of fast short pitched balls is unfair if in the opinion of the umpire at the bowler’s end he considers that by their repetition and taking into account their length, height and direction, they are likely to inflict physical injury on the striker, irrespective of the protective clothing and equipment he may be wearing. The relative skill of the striker shall also be taken into consideration.

42.5.2 In the event of such unfair bowling, the umpire at the bowler’s end shall adopt the following procedure:

a)    In the first instance the umpire shall call and signal no ball, caution the bowler and inform the other umpire, the captain of the fielding side and the batsmen of what has occurred.

b)    If this caution is ineffective, he shall repeat the above procedure and indicate to the bowler that this is a final warning.

c)    Both the above caution and final warning shall continue to apply even though the bowler may later change ends.

d)    Should there be any further instance by the same bowler in that innings, the umpire shall call and signal no ball and when the ball is dead direct the captain to take the bowler off forthwith. If necessary, the over shall be completed by another bowler, who shall neither have bowled the previous over, or part thereof, nor be allowed to bowl the next over, or part thereof. See Law 22.8. (Bowler Incapacitated or Suspended during an Over).

e)    The bowler thus taken off shall not be able to bowl again in that innings.

f)     The umpire will report the occurrence to the other umpire, the batsmen at the wicket and as soon as possible to the captain of the batting side.

g)    The umpires will then report the matter to the ICC Match Referee who shall take such action as is considered appropriate against the captain and the bowler concerned. (Refer also to Law 42.1 Fair and Unfair Play - Responsibility of the Captains.)

42.6  Law 42.8 - Deliberate bowling of High Full Pitched Balls

Law 42.8 shall be replaced by the following:

If the umpire considers that a high full pitch delivery which is deemed unfair as defined in Clause 42.4.2 was deliberately bowled, then the caution and warning process shall be dispensed with.

The umpire at the bowler’s end shall:

42.6.1  Call and signal no ball.

42.6.2  When the ball is dead, direct the captain to take the bowler off forthwith.

42.6.3  Not allow the bowler to bowl again in that innings.

42.6.4  Ensure that the over is completed by another bowler, provided that the bowler does not bowl two overs or part thereof consecutively.

42.6.5  Report the occurrence to the other umpire, to the captain of the batting side and the ICC Match Referee who shall take such action as is considered appropriate against the captain and the bowler concerned. (Refer also to Law 42.1 Fair and Unfair Play Responsibility of the Captains).

42.7  Action by the umpires for dangerous and unfair Bowling

Should the umpires initiate the caution and warning procedures set out in Clauses 42.4.1, 42.4.2, 42.5 and 42.6 such cautions and warnings are not to be cumulative.

42.8  Law 42.9 - Time Wasting by the Fielding Side

Law 42.9 shall apply subject to Law 42.9 (c) being replaced by the following:

If there is any further waste of time in that innings, by any member of the fielding side the umpire shall:

42.8.1  Call and signal dead ball if necessary, and;

42.8.2  Award 5 penalty runs to the batting side (see Law 42.17).

42.8.3  Inform the other umpire, the batsmen at the wicket and as soon as possible the captain of the batting side of what has occurred.

42.8.4  Report the occurrence to the ICC Match Referee who shall take such action as is considered appropriate against the captain and the team concerned under the ICC Code of Conduct.

42.9  Law 42.10 - Batsman Wasting Time

Law 42.10 shall apply, subject to the following:

If the incoming batsman is not in position to take guard or his partner not ready to receive the next ball within 2 minutes of the fall of the previous wicket, the action should be regarded by the umpires as time wasting and the provisions of Law 42.10 shall apply.

In addition, the umpires will report the incident to the ICC Match Referee under the ICC Code of Conduct.

42.10 Law 42.14 Batsman damaging the pitch

Law 42.14 shall apply.

See also clause 37 above.

42.11 Law 42.15 – Bowler attempting to run out non-striker before delivery

Law 42.15 shall be replaced by the following:

The bowler is permitted, before releasing the ball and provided he has not completed his usual delivery swing, to attempt to run out the non-striker. Whether the attempt is successful or not, the ball shall not count as one of the over. If the bowler fails in an attempt to run out the non-striker, the umpire shall call and signal Dead ball as soon possible.

42.12 Use of Electronic Communications Equipment

The use of electronic communication devices and equipment of any kind to communicate with players on the field of play shall not be permitted.














APPENDIX 1

All penalty runs in the Laws of Cricket (2000 Code 5th Edition - 2013) apply in International Cricket.

APPENDIX 2A

Calculation sheet for use when a delay or interruptions occur in the First Innings

Time


Net playing time available at start of the match
420 minutes
(A)
Time innings in progress
___________
(B)
Playing time lost
___________
(C)
Extra time available
___________
(D)
Time made up from reduced interval
___________
(E)
Effective playing time lost [C – (D + E)]
___________
(F)
Remaining playing time available (A - F)
___________
(G)
G divided by 4.2 (to 2 decimal places)
___________
(H)
Max overs per team [H/2] (round up fractions)
___________ (I)
Maximum overs per bowler [ I / 5 ]
___________

Duration of Powerplay Overs (initial, batting side) __________ + __________
Rescheduled Playing Hours


First session to commence or recommence
___________
(J)
Length of innings [I x 4.2] (round up fractions)
___________
(K)
Rescheduled first innings cessation time [ J + (KB) ]
___________
(L)
Length of interval
___________
(M)
Second innings commencement time [ L + M ]
___________
(N)
Rescheduled second innings cessation time [ N + K ]
___________ *(O)

* Ensure that the match is not finishing earlier than the original or rescheduled cessation time by applying Clause 12.4.2 a) iv). If so, add at least one over to each team and recalculate (I) to (O) above to prevent this from happening.


APPENDIX 2B

Calculation sheet to check whether an interruption during the First Innings should terminate the innings

Proposed re-start time
___________
(P)
Rescheduled cut-off time allowing for full use


of any extra time provision
___________
(Q)
Minutes between P and Q
___________
(R)
Potential overs to be bowled [ R / 4.2 ] (round up fractions)
___________
(S)
Number of complete overs faced to date in first innings
___________
(T)

If S is greater than T then revert to Appendix 2A

If S is less than or equal to T then the first innings is terminated and go to Appendix 3A


APPENDIX 3A

Calculation sheet for the start of the Second Innings

Maximum overs to be bowled:


(If first innings was terminated, S from Appendix 2B)
___________
(A)
Scheduled length of innings: [ A x 4.2 ] (round up fractions) ___________
(B)
Start time
___________
(C)
Scheduled cessation time [ C + B ]
___________
(D)

Overs per bowler and Fielding Restrictions

Maximum overs per bowler [ A / 5 ]                        ___________   overs

Duration of Powerplay overs (initial, batting side) __________ + __________

APPENDIX 3B

Calculation sheet for use when interruption occurs after the start of the Second Innings

Time

Time at start of innings                                     ___________ (A)

Time at start of interruption                                 ___________ (B)

Time innings in progress                                    ___________ (C)

Restart time                                                ___________ (D)

Length of interruption [ DB ]                             ___________ (E)

Additional time available: (Any unused provision for ‘Extra

Time’ or for earlier than scheduled start of second innings) ___________ (F)

Total playing time lost [ EF ]                             ___________ (G)

Overs

Maximum overs at start of innings                         ___________ (H)

Overs lost [ G / 4.2 ] (rounded down)                      ___________ (I)

Adjusted maximum length of innings [ HI ]              ___________ (J)

Rescheduled length of innings [ J x 4.2 rounded up ]      ___________ (K)

Amended cessation time of innings [ D + (KC) ]        ___________ (L)

Overs per bowler and Fielding Restrictions

Maximum overs per bowler [ J / 5 ]                        ___________ overs

Duration of Powerplay overs (initial, batting side)___________ + ___________

APPENDIX 4 - CREASE MARKINGS









(43.18cm) 17 inches





















(43.18cm) 17 inches

APPENDIX 5

Restriction of the placement of fieldsmen













































The final mark of the 15 yards radius shall be a line placed at an angle of 45°, measured from the popping crease at a point level with the middle stump.

APPENDIX 6

Decision Review System (DRS) - Playing Conditions

1    GENERAL

1.1    The DRS includes:

     The process for the referral by the on-field umpires of a decision to the third umpire and/or the consultation process (between the on-field umpire(s) and the third umpire) initiated by the on-field umpire(s) as set out in paragraph 2 below and which have been collectively termed in these playing conditions as an “Umpire Review”; and

     The process initiated by the players for the review of an on-field umpire’s decision (by means of a consultation between the on-field umpire(s) and the third umpire) as set out in paragraph 3 below and which has been termed in these playing conditions as the “Player Review”.

1.2    The ICC will be required to ensure that the television technology specifications set out in Appendix 7 are provided.

1.3    In particular, the ICC is to ensure that a separate room is provided for the third umpire and that he has access to the television equipment and technology as specified in Appendix 7 so as to be in the best position to facilitate the referral and/or consultation processes referred to in paragraphs 2 (Umpire Review) and

3 (Player Review) below.

1.4    The ICC shall appoint an independent technology expert (ICC Technical Official) to be present at every match to assist the third umpire and to protect the integrity of the DRS process.

2    UMPIRE REVIEW

In the circumstances detailed in paragraphs 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 below, the on-field umpire has the discretion to refer the decision to the third umpire or, in the case of 2.2.(a), 2.4 and 2.5, to consult with the third umpire before making the decision and should take a common sense approach.

Save for requesting the umpire to review his decision under paragraph 3 (Player Review) below, players may not appeal to the umpire to use the Umpire Review - breach of this provision would constitute dissent and the player could be liable for discipline under the ICC Code of Conduct.

The third umpire shall call for as many replays from any camera angle as is necessary to reach a decision. As a guide, a decision should be made within 30 sec-onds whenever possible, but the third umpire shall have the discretion to take more time.

2.1    Run Out, Stumping and Hit Wicket Decisions

a)   The on-field umpire shall be entitled to refer an appeal for a run-out, stumping or hit wicket to the third umpire.

b)   An on-field umpire wishing to refer a decision to the third umpire shall signal to the third umpire by making the shape of a TV screen with his hands.

c)   In the case of a referral of a hit wicket or stumping decision, the third umpire shall first check the fairness of the delivery (all modes of No ball except for the bowler using an illegal action, [for clarity, a specific type of banned delivery can be reviewed and called no ball]). If the delivery was not a fair delivery he shall indicate that the batsman is not out and advise the on-field umpire to signal no ball. See also paragraph 3.10 below.

d)  Additionally, if the third umpire finds the batsman is out by another mode of dismissal (excluding LBW), or not out by any mode of dismissal (excluding LBW), he shall notify the on-field umpire so that the correct decision is made.

e)   If the third umpire decides the batsman is out a red light is displayed; a green light means not-out. Should the third umpire be temporarily unable to re-spond, a white light (where available) will remain illuminated throughout the period of interruption to signify to the on-field umpires that the TV replay sys-tem is temporarily unavailable, in which case the decision will be taken by the on-field umpire. (As an alternative to the red/green light system and where available, the big replay screen may be used for the purpose of conveying the third umpire’s decision).

2.2    Caught Decisions

In the event of an appeal for a caught decision:

a)   Clean Catches

i)    Should the bowler’s end umpire be unable to decide whether or not a catch was taken cleanly, he shall first consult with the square leg umpire.

ii)  Should both on-field umpires require assistance from the third umpire to make a decision, the bowler’s end umpire shall firstly take a decision on-field after con-sulting with the other umpire, then he shall consult by two-way radio with the third umpire. Such consultation shall be initiated by the bowlers end umpire to the third umpire by making the shape of a TV screen with his hands, followed by an 'out' or 'not out' signal made with the hands close to the chest at chest height.

Following such consultation, the final decision will be made and given by the bowler’s end umpire, who will take into account the on-field umpires’ initial views and any other advice received from the third umpire. If the third umpire advises that the replay evidence is inconclusive, the on-field decision communicated at the start of the consultation process shall stand.

iii)  The third umpire has to determine whether the batsman has been caught. However, in reviewing the television replay(s), the third umpire shall first check the fairness of the delivery (all modes of No ball except for the bowler using an illegal action, [for clarity, a specific type of banned delivery can be reviewed and called no ball]) and whether the batsman has hit the ball. If the delivery was not a fair delivery or if it is clear to the third umpire that the batsman did not hit the ball he shall indicate to the on-field umpire that the batsman is not out caught, and in the case of an unfair delivery, advise the on-field umpire to signal no ball. See also paragraph 3.10 below. Additionally, if it is clear to the third umpire that the batsman is out by another mode of dismissal (excluding LBW), or not out by any mode of dismissal (excluding LBW), he shall notify the on-field umpire so that the correct decision is made.

b)   Bump Ball

i)    Should the bowler’s end umpire be unable to decide whether a catch was taken from a bump ball or not, he shall first consult with the square leg um-pire.

ii)   Should both on-field umpires be unable to make a decision, the bowler’s end umpire shall be entitled to refer the decision to the third umpire to review a TV replay(s) of the batsman’s stroke as in paragraph 2.1 (b).

iii)  The third umpire has to determine whether the ball was a bump ball or not. However, in reviewing the television replay(s), the third umpire shall first check the fairness of the delivery (all modes of No ball except for the bowler using an illegal action, [for clarity, a specific type of banned delivery can be reviewed and called no ball]) and whether the batsman has hit the ball. If the delivery was not a fair delivery or if it is clear to the third umpire that the batsman did not hit the ball he shall indicate that the batsman is not out and, in the case of an unfair delivery, advise the on-field umpire to signal no ball. See also paragraph 3.10 below. Additionally, if it is clear to the third umpire that the batsman is out by another mode of dismissal (excluding LBW), or not out by any mode of dismissal (excluding LBW), he shall notify the on-field umpire so that the correct decision is made.

iv)  The third umpire shall communicate his decision by the system as in paragraph 2.1 (d).

2.3    Boundary Decisions

a)   The on-field umpire shall be entitled to refer to the third umpire for a decision about whether the fieldsman had any part of his person in contact with the ball when he touched the boundary or when he had any part of his person grounded beyond the boundary, or whether a four or six had been scored. A decision is to be made immediately and cannot be changed thereafter.

Note: If the television evidence is inconclusive as to whether or not a boundary has been scored, the status quo will remain, and it shall be treated as runs scored by the batting side.

b)   An on-field umpire wishing the assistance of the third umpire in this circumstance shall communicate with the third umpire by use of a two-way radio and the third umpire will convey his decision to the on-field umpire by this method.

c)   The third umpire may initiate contact with the on-field umpire by two-way radio if TV coverage shows a boundary line infringement or incident that appears not to have been acted upon by the

on-field umpires.

2.4    Obstructing the Field

a)    Following an appeal from the fielding side, the on-field umpire shall be entitled to consult with the third umpire if he feels that the batsman has obstructed the field.

b)   The bowler’s end umpire shall firstly take a decision on-field after consulting with the other umpire (if necessary), then he shall consult by two-way radio with the third umpire. Such consultation shall be initiated by the bowlers end umpire to the third umpire by making the shape of a TV screen with his hands, followed by an 'out' or 'not out' signal made with the hands close to the chest at chest height.

c)   Following such consultation with the third umpire, the final decision shall be indicated in the normal fashion by the bowlers end umpire. If the third umpire advises that the replay evidence is inconclusive, the on-field decision communicated at the start of the consultation process shall stand.


2.5    Batsmen Running to the Same End

a)   In the event of both batsmen running to the same end and the umpires are uncertain over which batsmen made his ground first, the on-field umpire may consult with the third umpire.

b)   The procedure in paragraph 2.3 (b) shall apply.

3    PLAYER REVIEW

The following clauses shall operate in addition to and in conjunction with paragraph 2 (Umpire Review).

3.1    Circumstances in which a Player Review may be requested

a)   A player may request a review of any decision taken by the on-field umpires concerning whether or not a batsman is dismissed, with the exception of

‘Timed Out’ (Player Review).

b)   For the avoidance of doubt, no other decisions made by the umpires are eligible for a Player Review.

c)   Only the batsman involved in a dismissal may request a Player Review of an ‘Out’ decision and only the captain (or acting captain) of the fielding team may request a Player Review of a ‘Not Out’ decision.

d)   A decision concerning whether or not a batsman is dismissed that could have been the subject of a Umpire Review under paragraph 2 is eligible for a Player Review as soon as it is clear that the on-field umpire has chosen not to initiate the Umpire Review.

3.2    The manner of requesting the Player Review

a)   The request should be made by the player making a ‘T’ sign with both forearms at head height.

b)   The total time elapsed between the ball becoming dead and the review request being made should be no more than 15 seconds. The on-field umpire should provide the player with a prompt after 10 seconds if the request has not been made at that time and the player should request the review immediately thereafter. If the umpires believe that a request has not been made within the 15 second time frame, they will decline to review the decision.

c)   The captain may consult with the bowler and other fielders or the two batsmen may consult with each other prior to deciding whether to request a Player Review. However in order to meet the requirement of (b) above, such consultation will need to occur almost instantly and be very brief. Under no circumstances is any player permitted to query an umpire about any aspect of a decision before deciding on whether or not to request a Player Review. If the umpires believe that the captain or batsman has received direct or indirect input emanating other than from the players on the field, then they may at their discretion decline the request for a Player Review. In particular, signals from the dressing room must not be given.

d)   No replays, either at normal speed or slow motion, should be shown on a big screen to spectators until the time allowed for the requesting of a Player Review has elapsed. See also paragraph 3.11 below.

e)   If either on-field umpire initiates an Umpire Review under paragraph 2, this does not preclude a player seeking a Player Review of a separate incident from the same delivery. The Player Review request may be made after the Umpire Review provided it is still within the timescale described in (b) above. (See 3.8 (b) and 3.8 (c) below for the process for addressing both an Umpire and Player Review).

f)   A request for a Player Review may not be withdrawn once it has been made.

3.3    The process of consultation

a)   On receipt of an eligible and timely request for a Player Review, the on-field umpire will make the sign of a television with his hands in the normal way.

b)   He will initiate communication with the third umpire by confirming the decision that has been made and that the player has requested a Player Review.

c)   The third umpire must then work alone, independent of outside help or comment, other than when consulting the on-field umpire.

d)   A two-way consultation process should begin to investigate whether there is anything that the third umpire can see or hear which would indicate that the on-field umpire should change his decision.

e)   This consultation should be on points of fact, where possible phrased in a manner leading to yes or no answers. Questions requiring a single answer based on a series of judgements, such as “do you think that was LBW?” are to be avoided.

f)   The third umpire shall not withhold any factual information which may help in the decision making process, even if the information is not directly prompted by the on-field umpire’s questions. In particular, in reviewing a dismissal, if the third umpire believes that the batsman may instead be out by any other mode of dismissal, he shall advise the on-field umpire accordingly. The process of consultation described in this paragraph in respect of such other mode of dismissal shall then be conducted as if the batsman has been given not out.

g)   The third umpire should initially check whether the delivery is fair (all modes of No ball except for the bowler using an illegal action, [for clarity, a specific type of banned delivery can be reviewed and called no ball]) where appropriate advising the on-field umpire accordingly. See also paragraph 3.10 below.

h)   If despite the available technology, the third umpire is unable to answer with a high degree of confidence a particular question posed by the on-field umpire, then he should report that the replays are ‘inconclusive’. The third umpire should not give answers conveying likelihoods or probabilities.

i)    Subject to paragraph 3.3 (j) below, specifically when advising on LBW decisions, the requirement for a high degree of confidence should be interpreted as follows:

i)    With regard to determining the point of pitching the evidence provided by technology should be regarded as definitive and the Laws as interpreted in clause

3.9 (a) below should be strictly applied.

ii)   With regard to the point of impact

      If a ‘not out’ decision is being reviewed, in order to report that the point of impact is between wicket and wicket (i.e. in line with the stumps), the evidence provided by technology should show that the centre of the ball at the moment of interception is in line within an area demarcated by a line drawn down the middle of the outer stumps.

      If an ‘out’ decision is being reviewed, in order to report that the point of impact is not between wicket and wicket (i.e. outside the line of the stumps), the evidence provided by technology should show that no part of the ball at the moment of interception is between wicket and wicket.

iii)  With regard to determining whether the ball was likely to have hit the stumps:

      If a ‘not out’ decision is being reviewed, in order to report that the ball is hitting the stumps, the evidence provided by technology should show that the centre of the ball would have hit the stumps within an area demarcated by a line drawn below the lower edge of the bails and down the middle of the outer stumps.

However, where the evidence shows that the ball would have hit the stumps within the demarcated area as set out above but that:
     The point of impact is 300cm or more from the stumps; or

     The point of impact is more than 250cm but less than 300cm from the stumps and the distance between point of pitching and point of impact is

less than 40cm,

the original decision will stand (i.e. not out).

      If an ‘out’ decision is being reviewed, in order to report that the ball is missing the stumps, the evidence of the technology should show that no part of the ball would have made contact with any part of the stumps or bails.

iv)       With regard to determining whether the ball was likely to have hit the stumps after striking the pad on the full and being predicted to pitch before striking or passing the stumps:

- The technology should predict the line of the delivery in accordance with Law 36.2b and show this path from directly above the stumps in the sim-ulation.

- The 3rd umpire shall advise the on-field umpire whether the ball was going to intercept the line of the stumps based on the prediction of the tech-nology, and make no comment on the predicted height of the ball after pitching, which shall remain a judgment of the on-field umpire.

j)    In circumstances where the television technology (all or parts thereof) is not available to the third umpire or fails for whatever reason, the third umpire shall advise the on-field umpire of this fact but still provide any relevant factual information that may be ascertained from the available television replays and other technology. See also paragraph 3.5 (d).

k)   The on-field umpire must then make his decision based on those factual questions that were answered by the third umpire, any other factual information offered by the third umpire and his recollection and opinion of the original incident.

l)    The on-field umpire will reverse his decision if the nature of the supplementary information received from the third umpire leads him to conclude that his original decision was incorrect.

3.4    The process for communicating the final decision

a)   When the on-field umpire has reached a decision, he should advise the TV director (directly or via the third umpire).

b)   For Player Reviews concerning potential dismissals, he should then indicate “Out” by raising his finger above his head in a normal yet prominent manner or indicate “Not Out” by the call of ‘not out’ and by crossing his hands in a horizontal position side to side in front and above his waist three times (as per a ‘safe’ decision in baseball). Where the decision is a reversal of the on-field umpire’s previous decision, he should make the ‘revoke last signal’ indication immediately prior to the above.

c)   If the mode of dismissal is not obvious or not the same as that on which the original decision was based, then the umpire should advise the official scorers via the third umpire.

3.5    Number of Player Review requests permitted

a)   Each team is allowed to make one unsuccessful Player Review requests per innings. If a Player Review results in the umpire reversing his original decision, then the request has been successful and does not count towards the innings limit. If the umpire’s decision is unchanged, the Player Review is unsuccessful. After one unsuccessful request by one team, no further Player Review requests will be allowed by that team during the current innings.

b)   If following a Player Review, an umpire upholds a decision of ‘Out’, but for a different mode of dismissal from that for which the original decision was given, then the request will still be regarded as unsuccessful.

c)   If following a Player Review, an umpire upholds a decision of ‘Not Out’ on account of the delivery being a no ball for any reason, thereby not requiring any review of the ball’s subsequent trajectory, then this will not be counted as an unsuccessful request and not count towards the innings limit.

d)   If a Player Review and an Umpire Review occur from the same delivery and the decision from the Umpire Review renders the Player Review unnecessary (see 3.8 (b) and 3.8 (c)), then the Player Review request will be ignored and not be counted as unsuccessful.

e)   An unsuccessful review may be re-instated by the Match Referee at his sole discretion (if appropriate after consultation with the ICC Technical Official and/or the television broadcast director), if the review could not properly be concluded due to a failure of the technology. Any such decision shall be final and should be taken as soon as possible once all the relevant facts have been ascertained by the Match Referee. An unsuccessful review shall not be re-instated if, despite any technical failures, the correct decision could still have been made using the other available technology. Similarly, no reinstatement shall be made where the technology worked as intended, but the evidence gleaned from its use was “inconclusive”.

f)   The third umpire shall be responsible for counting the number of unsuccessful Player Reviews and advising the on-field umpires once either team has exhausted their allowance for that innings.

g)   The scoreboard shall display, for the innings in progress, the number of Player Reviews remaining available to each team.

3.6    Dead ball

a)   If following a Player Review request, an original decision of ‘Out’ is changed to ‘Not Out’, then the ball is still deemed to have become dead when the original decision was made (as per Law 23.1(a)(iii)). The batting side, while benefiting from the reversal of the dismissal, will not benefit from any runs that may subsequently have accrued from the delivery had the on-field umpire originally made a ‘Not Out’ decision, other than any No Balls penalty that could arise under

3.3 (g) above.

b)   If an original decision of ‘Not Out’ is changed to ‘Out’, the ball will retrospectively be deemed to have become dead from the moment of the dismissal

event. All subsequent events, including any runs scored, are ignored.

3.7    Use of technology

a)   The following technology may be used by the third umpire.
     Slow motion replays from all available cameras

     Super slow motion replays from all available cameras

     Ultra motion camera replays from all available cameras

     Sound from the stump microphones with the replays at normal speed and slow motion

     Approved ball tracking technology

     The mat, generated by the provider of ball tracking technology, not by the broadcaster

     Hot Spot cameras

      Real-Time Snickometer

     Zing Wickets (using the lights to indicate if the wicket is broken).

In addition, other forms of technology may be used subject to ICC being satisfied that the required standards of accuracy and time efficiency can be met.

b)   Where practical usage or further testing indicates that any of the above forms of technology cannot reliably provide accurate and timely information, then it may be removed prior to or during a match. The final decision regarding the technology to be used in a given match will be taken by the ICC Match Referee in consultation with the ICC Technical Official, ICC Management and the Event Technical Committee.

3.8    Combining Umpire Reviews with Player Reviews

a)   If an Umpire Review (under Clause 2) and a Player Review request are made following the same delivery but relating to separate modes of dismissal, the following procedure shall apply.

b)   The Umpire Review should be carried out prior to the Player Review if all of the following conditions apply:

i)    The Player Review has been requested by the fielding side

ii)   The Umpire Review and the Player Review both relate to the dismissal of the same batsman

iii)  If the batsman is out, the number of runs scored from the delivery would be the same for both modes of dismissal

iv)  If the batsman is out, the batsman on strike for the next delivery would be the same for both modes of dismissal.

c)   If the Umpire Review leads the third umpire to make a decision of ‘Out’, then this will be displayed in the usual manner and the Player Review will not be performed. If the Umpire Review results in a not out decision, then the third umpire will make no public decision but proceed to address the Player Review request.

For illustration, following an unsuccessful lbw appeal, the striker sets off for a run, is sent back and there is an appeal for his run out. The players request that the lbw decision is reviewed and the umpires request that the run out be reviewed. The four criteria above are satisfied, so the run out referral is determined first. Should the appeal for run out be ‘Out’, then there is no requirement for the lbw review to take place.

d)   In all other circumstances, the two incidents shall be addressed in chronological order. If the conclusion from the first incident is that a batsman is dismissed, then the ball would be deemed to have become dead at that point, rendering investigation of the second incident unnecessary.

3.9    Interpretation of Laws

a)   When using technology to determine where the ball pitched (as per Law 36.1(b)), the third umpire should refer to the “point” (or centre) of the ball. Therefore if at least 50% of the ball pitches outside the line of leg stump, then no LBW dismissal is possible.

b)   When using a replay to determine the moment at which the wicket has been put down (as per Law 28.1), the third umpire should deem this to be the first frame in which one of the bails is shown (or can be deduced) to have lost all contact with the top of the stumps and subsequent frames show the bail permanently removed from the top of the stumps.

3.10  No Balls

Following any mode of dismissal that is not permitted off a no ball and which is not the subject of an Umpire or Player Review, if the on-field umpire is uncertain as the fairness of the delivery, he shall be entitled to request the batsman to delay leaving the field and to check the fairness of the delivery (all modes of No ball except for the bowler using an illegal action, [for clarity, a specific type of banned delivery can be reviewed and called no ball]) with the third umpire. Consultation with the third umpire shall be by way of two way radio. If the delivery was not a fair delivery the on-field umpire shall indicate that the batsman is not-out and signal no-ball. For the avoidance of doubt, the third umpire shall apply clause 24.2 when deciding whether a no-ball should have been called.

3.11  Big Screen Policy

The current ICC big screen policy will apply. See also 3.2(d)

APPENDIX 7

DRS Third Umpire Room and Television Broadcast Specifications

Specifications will be circulated separately.

APPENDIX 8

Application of the Reserve Day

Example 1:

Match starts at 50 overs per side and there is an interruption at 19 overs. Overs are reduced to 46 overs per side and play is about to resume. Before another ball is bowled it rains and play is abandoned for the day.

As the match didn’t resume under the revised overs, the match should continue on the reserve day at the original 50 overs per side with the overs reduced if necessary during the day.

Example 2:

The same start as in example 1 i.e. match starts at 50 overs per side and there is an interruption at 19 overs. Overs are reduced to 46 overs per side and play is about to resume. This time, play starts and after an over has been bowled it rains and play is abandoned for the day.

As the match has resumed, it is continued on the reserve day at 46 overs per side with the overs reduced if necessary during the day.

Example 3:

The toss occurs on the scheduled day but the match is abandoned for the day without a ball being bowled.

When play commences on the reserve day:
     The captains shall not be entitled to re-toss (and nominate new teams)

     These matches shall always be regarded in the records as a single match.

Note: If the reserve day is utilised, the hours of play on the reserve day are the same as the scheduled hours of play on the scheduled day, including any provision for extra time. The amount of extra time available on the reserve day cannot exceed that which was available on the scheduled day.

APPENDIX 9

SUMMARY OF CHANGES TO PLAYING CONDITIONS
FOR WARM UP MATCHES

NOTE: